Kim Jong-un

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It is the party’s steadfast determination to ensure that the people will never have to tighten their belt again.
The effort to develop the economy and improve the people’s standard of living can be successful only when it is backed by powerful military capabilities, nuclear forces.

Kim Jong-un (born 8 January between 1982 – 84 or 5 July 1984) is the Chairman of the Workers' Party of Korea (WPK) and supreme leader of North Korea since 2011.

Quotes[edit]

The days are gone forever when our enemies could blackmail us with nuclear bombs.
  • I hear from higher up that China seems to be succeeding on many fronts – engineering, commerce, hotels, agriculture - everything. In many ways, don’t we need to take them as a model example for us?
    • As recounted by household chef Kenji Fujimoto, [1]
  • It is the party’s steadfast determination to ensure that the people will never have to tighten their belt again.
    • April 15th 2012 speech in Kim Il-Sung Square, [2]
  • Yesterday, we were a weak and small country trampled upon by big powers. Today, our geopolitical location remains the same, but we are transformed into a proud political and military power and an independent people that no one can dare provoke. The days are gone forever when our enemies could blackmail us with nuclear bombs.
    • April 15th 2012 speech in Kim Il-Sung Square, [3]
  • The effort to develop the economy and improve the people’s standard of living can be successful only when it is backed by powerful military capabilities, nuclear forces. In the spirit with which we conquered outer space and with the mettle with which we succeeded in the nuclear test of a high level, we must push ahead simultaneously with the campaign to defend the country and the construction of an economic giant, and thus achieve the happiness of the people and the prosperity of the powerful Paektusan nation without fail.
    • Report to the March 2013 Plenary Meeting of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea, announcing the byungjin (dual advancement) policy line
  • President Donald Trump's remarks which described the U.S. option through straightforward expression of his will have convinced me, rather than frightening or stopping me, that the path I chose is correct and that it is the one I have to follow to the last. [...] Action is the best option in treating the dotard who, hard of hearing, is uttering only what he wants to say. [...] I am now thinking hard about what response he could have expected when he allowed such eccentric words to trip off his tongue. Whatever Trump might have expected, he will face results beyond his expectation. I will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged U.S. dotard with fire.
  • In no way would the United States dare to ignite a war against me and our country. The whole of its mainland is within the range of our nuclear strike and the nuclear button is on my office desk all the time; the United States needs to be clearly aware that this is not merely a threat but a reality.
    • New Year 2018 address
  • I know the Americans are inherently disposed against us, but when they talk with us, they will see that I am not the kind of person who would shoot nuclear weapons to the south, over the Pacific or at the United States.

Quotes about Kim Jong-un[edit]

Why would Kim Jong-un insult me by calling me "old," when I would NEVER call him "short and fat?" Oh well, I try so hard to be his friend - and maybe someday that will happen!~Donald Trump
  • I think that Mr Kim Jong Un has obviously won this round. He has completed his strategic task: he has a nuclear weapon, he has missiles of global reach, up to 13,000 km, which can reach almost any point of the globe. He is an absolutely competent and already mature politician.
  • Fred had also primed Donald to be drawn to men such as Cohn, as he would later be drawn to authoritarians such as Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong-un or anyone else, really, with a willingness to flatter and the power to enrich him.
    • Mary L. Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man (2020), p. 101
  • He's the head of a country, and I mean he's the strong head, don't let anyone think anything different. He speaks and his people sit up at attention. I want my people to do the same.
  • After the election, Donald called his big sister, ostensibly to find out how he was doing. Of course, he thought he already knew the answer; otherwise he wouldn't have made the call in the first place. He merely wanted her to confirm very strongly that he was doing a fantastic job. When she said, "Not that good," Donald immediately went on offense. "That's nasty," he said. She could see the sneer on his face. Then, seemingly apropos of nothing, he asked her, "Maryanne, where would you be without me?" It was a smug reference to the fact that Maryanne owed her first federal judgeship to Donald because Roy Cohn had done him (and her) a favor all those years ago. My aunt has always insisted that she earned her position on the bench entirely on her own merits, and she shot back at him, "If you say that one more time, I will level you." But it was an empty threat. Although Maryanne had prided herself on being the only person on the planet Donald ever listened to, those days were long past, which was illustrated not long after, in June 2018. On the eve of Donald's first summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, Maryanne called the White House and left a message with his secretary: "Tell him his older sister called with a little sisterly advice. Prepare. Learn from those who know what they are doing. Stay away from Dennis Rodman. And leave his Twitter alone." He ignored all of it. The Politico headline the following day read "Trump Says Kim Meeting Will Be About 'Attitude,' Not Prep Work." If Maryanne had ever had any sway over her little brother, it was gone now. Aside from the requisite birthday call, they didn't speak much after that.
    • Mary L. Trump, Too Much And Never Enough: How My Family Created The World's Most Dangerous Man (2020), p. 188-189
  • On September 19, 2017, President Trump gave his first address to the United Nations General Assembly. For the first time, he dubbed the North Korean leader "Rocket Man." He said the United States, if forced to defend itself, "will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea." Kim fired back three days later. "A frightened dog barks louder," and said Trump is "surely a rogue and a gangster fond of playing with fire. I will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged U.S. dotard." In a tweet on September 23 Trump called Kim "Little Rocket Man." Trump and Rob Porter were together in the president's front cabin on Air Force One. "Little Rocket Man," Trump said proudly. "I think that may be my best ever, best nickname ever." "It is funny," Porter said, "and it certainly seems to have gotten under Kim's skin." But, he asked, "What's the endgame here? If we continue to amp up the rhetoric and get into a war of words and it escalates, what are you hoping to get out of this? How does this end?" "You can never show weakness," Trump replied. "You've got to project strength. Kim and others need to be convinced that I'm prepared to do anything to back up our interests." "Yes, you want to keep him on his toes," Porter said. "And you want some air of unpredictability from you. And we're not sure, is he even well? Is he all mentally there? He doesn't have the same political constraints that other people do. He seems very much to want to be taken seriously on the international stage." "You've got to show strength," the president repeated. "I wonder," Porter plowed on, "if embarrassing him is more likely to sort of get him into submission or if it could also provoke him?" Trump didn't respond. His body language suggested that he knew Kim was capable of anything. Then he offered his conclusion: It was a contest of wills. "This is all about leader versus leader. Man versus man. Me versus Kim."
    • Bob Woodward, Fear: Trump in the White House (2018), p. 280-281

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