Richard Wolffe

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Richard L. Wolffe (born 17 September 1968) is a British-American journalist, commentator, columnist and political author of the books Renegade: The Making of a President (Crown, June 2009), Revival: The Struggle for Survival Inside the Obama White House (Crown, November 2010), & The Message: The Reselling of President Obama (Twelve, 2013). Richard Wolffe is a US columnist for The Guardian. He was most recently vice-president and executive editor of MSNBC.com.


Quotes[edit]

  • Let's begin with [Trump's] the simplest assertion: we are doing "great" economically... over the last 20 years the United States has had a hard time achieving economic growth. The last year or two are slightly better... because the government gave an enormous boost... not private capitalist corporations, the government gave... The 2017 tax cut... gave corporations... hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes they don't have to pay anymore... and they mostly used it to increase salaries of executives... very good for the top one percent, but not for the rest of the American people.
  • Chinese workers, the average amount of money they get adjusted for inflation, has quadrupled in the last 12, 15 years. What happened to the average wage in America, adjusted for inflation? It hardly budged... Excluding that from the conversation - prancing around as if the economy here is the envy of the world - that's not just nonsense.
  • ...he spent more time... demonizing immigrants than on any other topic.... the United States is an economy of three hundred and twenty five million people; the number of undocumented immigrants in the United States is estimated between 10 and 12 million [~3.4]% .... Focusing on immigrants is pure scapegoating; it's focusing people on something that doesn't matter because you don't want them to focus on what does matter.


Richard Wolff: We Need a More Humane Economic System—Not One That Only Benefits the Rich[edit]

Democracy Now(26 December 2018)

  • A country that promises it is committed to democracy has never faced the fact that in the enterprise we don’t have democracy. We have a tiny group of people making all the decisions. And that’s not a good idea... we cannot afford the luxury of not facing basic questions about how our economy is organized... Maybe this new generation of young people coming into the Congress will begin that conversation and, hopefully, bring us along into a national debate on these subjects, which is long overdue.
  • We have been following—and, unfortunately, Democrats, too — something called trickle-down economics. We do economic policy where we help the folks at the top — we bail out the big banks...first thing they can do, reverse it. Let’s do trickle-up economics. You help the people at the bottom... put people to work....doing socially useful things at a decent income... greening of America... could help millions of people in a direct way...The minimum wage should be raised, and dramatically. We should be helping all the kinds of people who have been denied help. We should be making sure that jobs are secure...have proper benefits... all the things that could help the folks at the bottom have the money to spend, that will trickle up into the profits and revenues of business. That’s a more humane system..and even if it doesn’t work as much as we want it to, at least we will have helped the majority of people. What we have now is trickle-down, that helps those of the top, and then, when it doesn’t trickle down, what have we got? We’ve helped those at the top—again.

Recession

  • It’s just about to hit us. Goldman Sachs is literally predicting it. JPMorgan Chase—you mentioned these institutions before — they’re all saying in their newsletters — if you read the financial press, it’s not a question of whether, it’s just a question of when. And it’s sort of within the next six to 18 months. So, yes, it’s possible those will be wrong, but, you know... It’s a good bet. And so, yes, we’re going to have one.


Let's drop the euphemisms: Donald Trump is a racist president (2018)[edit]

Let's drop the euphemisms: Donald Trump is a racist president (14 July 2018), The Guardian.
  • Trump is a walking contradiction – but his nativism is consistent.
  • Watching this pinball president ricochet around Europe, you could be forgiven for thinking there’s no method to Donald Trump’s madness. Nato is both a rip-off and very strong. Theresa May’s Brexit plan is both pathetic and terrific. Trump’s interview with the Sun was both fake news and generally fine. Trump has all the consistency of Katy Perry’s Hot N Cold, except when it comes to two things: immigrants and Vladimir Putin.
  • Immigration is where Trump’s journey begins and ends: the message running all the way through this stick of rock.
  • There was a time when politicians like you preferred to use a dog whistle, but those days seem quaint now. There’s something to be said for using a foghorn to blast your racism across the continents. At least we all know what kind of politics you represent.
  • So now we know. The reason Trump ordered the separation of thousands of immigrant children from their parents – some never to be reunited again – was because they better watch themselves. They are changing the culture and it better stop or else they’ll get hurt. Trump has mused before about how good it would be to deport people without judges messing things up. He doesn’t consider his own country’s ample immigration laws to be actual laws that he respects. It’s one short step for a president – but one long step for democracy – to go from disrespecting the laws to ignoring them. This is the language and mentality of so many extreme-right and neo-Nazi parties in Europe. So in the Trump spirit of saying it loud, it’s time to drop the euphemisms: Trump is today’s first major government to be led by the racist far right. It’s not some kind of new populist politics; it’s the old National Front.
  • The moral choices that Trump poses to anyone with a conscience or love of country are only made more clear by the ludicrous irony of his own story.

External links[edit]

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