Statius

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Publius Papinius Statius (c. 45 – c. 96) was a Roman poet of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

Sourced[edit]

The Thebaid[edit]

The translations are by D. R. Shackleton Bailey, and are taken from vol. 207 of the Loeb Classical Library (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003).

  • Tacitumque a principe vulgus
    dissidet, et, qui mos populis, venturus amatur.
    • The crowd is at silent odds with the prince. As is the way of a populace, the man of the future is the favourite.
    • Bk. 1, line 169
  • Pessimus in dubiis augur, timor.
    • Fear (in times of doubt the worst of prophets) revolves many things.
    • Bk. 3, line 6
  • Quid crastina volveret aetas
    scire nefas homini.
    • What the morrow's years might bring 'twas sin for man to know.
    • Bk. 3, line 562
  • Primus in orbe deos fecit timor.
    • Fear first made gods in the world.
    • Bk. 3, line 661
    • These words also appear in a fragmentary poem attributed to Petronius.

External links[edit]

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