Talk:Aung San Suu Kyi

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  • Human beings the world over need freedom and security that they may be able to realize their full potential.
  • I think by now I have made it fairly clear that I am not very happy with the word "hope." I don't believe in people just hoping. We work for what we want. I always say that one has no right to hope without endeavor, so we work to try and bring about the situation that is necessary for the country, and we are confident that we will get to the negotiation table at one time or another. This is the way all such situations pan out — even with the most truculent dictator.
  • I think this is the case in the great majority of authoritarian states: on the surface, because of repression, everything seems frozen, but when the sun comes out and the ice melts, you find that there was a lot of life underneath all along.
  • It is often in the name of cultural integrity as well as social stability and national security that democratic reforms based on human rights are resisted by authoritarian governments.
  • Peace as a goal is an ideal which will not be contested by any government or nation, not even the most belligerent.
  • Sometimes, 24 hours can bring a total revolutionary change.
  • The democracy process provides for political and social change without violence.
  • The history of the world shows that peoples and societies do not have to pass through a fixed series of stages in the course of development.
  • The only real prison is fear, and the only real freedom is freedom from fear.
  • The provision of basic material needs is not sufficient to make minority groups and indigenous peoples feel they are truly part of the greater national entity. For that they have to be confident that they too have an active role to play in shaping the destiny of the state that demands their allegiance.
  • The struggle for democracy and human rights in Burma is a struggle for life and dignity. It is a struggle that encompasses our political, social and economic aspirations. [1]
  • The value systems of those with access to power and of those far removed from such access cannot be the same. The viewpoint of the privileged is unlike that of the underprivileged.
  • We achieve everything by our efforts alone. Our fate is not decided by an almighty God. We decide our own fate by our actions. You have to gain mastery over yourself. . . . It is not a matter of sitting back and accepting.
  • We will prevail because our cause is right, because our cause is just. ...History is on our side. Time is on our side.
  • What is there to be discouraged about? Gandhi said the victory is in the struggle itself. The struggle itself is the most important thing. I tell our followers that when we achieve democracy, we will look back with nostalgia on the struggle and how pure we were.
  • Wouldn't you say that unity comes first? Out of unity comes security. I don't think you can impose security from on top. Just look at Yugoslavia. For years it seemed as if everything was quiescent, but this was not the kind of security you would like — something that was imposed on the people and not something that had arisen from trust and understanding between them. So I think we want to put unity first. Out of real unity — which can only be based on understanding and mutual respect — will come the kind of security that we really want and the people really want.