Talk:Peanuts

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Broken link[edit]

Just thought I should let y'all know that this here link doesn't go anywhere: that particular page in the GoComics archive appears not to be present although I don't know why. Maybe someone got the date wrong? I don't know where to find the right one, so just adding this here for someone who does. (It's the "why aren't you a pony" one). After a little more Googling it appears the date is printed in several places, but always in exactly the same format which makes me wonder if everyone got it from the same place...it's also possible that someone requested that particular strip be taken down for some reason or other. In particular, the next strip is 2 September which picks up halfway through an ongoing sequence, so there appears to be a chunk of the archive missing.

Expand[edit]

If anyone can add to the quotes, particularly the minor characters (Violet, Patty, Franklin, Pigpen - and the exact details of Freida's preening over her "naturally curly hair") it would be great. - Aerobird 23:13, 7 February 2006 (UTC)

Citation Formatting[edit]

What does everyone think is the best way to handle citations on this page? Where we had a definite date I've been giving book titles & page numbers too so that people know exactly where to look for them, but whoever updated last took away the book titles/pages. Now we've just got dates with no context at all, and also dates that are formatted European style, which is probably going to confuse some of us poor ignorant North Americans. I really think that even if we don't include book references (though I think we should whenever we have a date to go with them, to make the citation as complete as possible), we should at least keep the date in a clear longhand format (e.g. October 2, 1950) so that there's no confusion over whether 10-2-50 means October 2nd or February 10th.--68.54.160.41 03:10, 16 March 2006 (UTC)

Well I used and prefer the "European style" date format (despite being a North American), but a format of "2 October 1950" (i.e.) should work. However adding book titles, IMHO, clutters the page too much (and also should become more and more unneccessary as The Complete Peanuts series comes out). - Aerobird 01:13, 18 March 2006 (UTC)
The Wikiquote "style guide" says, "When sourcing, be as accurate as possible (emphasis mine): specify the source, the place within the source (if reasonable) and if the source is online, link to it. ISBNs, chapter numbers, editions and page numbers all ease the work of future accuracy checking." And if you look at other articles, that's what people have generally done. See Thomas Jefferson and Albert Einstein for examples, or for a comics example see Bill Watterson, which doesn't have dates but does have books and page numbers for the quotes from Calvin & Hobbes. What others have done that we have not been doing, though, is setting the citation off on a separate line with an indented bullet. That may help make it less "cluttered" if they're clearly set off like that.--68.54.160.41 22:48, 18 March 2006 (UTC)
The trouble is, many of the strips have been reprinted in multiple books. Which do you reference? And IMHO the "bullet indent" simply adds to the clutter (it's certainly visually unattractve). IMHO (again), the "source" here is simply "The Comic Strip Known As Peanuts", and the date is the only reference needed. (This is, of course, a no-brainer for strips already covered in The Complete Peanuts which is now up to 1960 IIRC?). Perhaps, until all of the strips have been reprinted in TCPs, a "references" section at the bottom could list the books used and the relevant date-ranges. - Aerobird 03:12, 19 March 2006 (UTC)
I think that's a fair compromise. Truth be told, I don't much like the bulleted citations either (I think the parenthetical is cleaner), but I do think we should be citing our work as extensively as we can; having the books referenced at the bottom is a good enough way to do it.--68.54.160.41 19:35, 19 March 2006 (UTC)

'mixing up his proverbs: "He to whom the early bird runs best learns wisdom and knowledge!"' is actually repeated in the article!