Cattle

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The cattle are grazing,
Their heads never raising:
There are forty feeding like one!

Cattle (colloquially cows) are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae, are the most widespread species of the genus Bos, and are most commonly classified collectively as Bos primigenius. Cattle are raised as livestock for meat (beef and veal), as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products, and as draft animals (pulling carts, plows and the like). Other products include leather and dung for manure or fuel. In some countries, such as India, cattle are sacred. It is estimated that there are 1.3 billion cattle in the world today.

Sourced[edit]

  • The cattle upon a thousand hills.
    • Psalms, line 10, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 30.
  • The cattle are grazing,
    Their heads never raising:
    There are forty feeding like one!
    • William Wordsworth, The Cock is Crowing, written in March while on the bridge, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 30.

Cows[edit]

  • God sends a curst cow short horns.
    • William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing (c. 1598), Act 2, Scene 1
    • Variant: A curst cow hath short horns.
    • Note: "Curst" here refers to being ill-tempered, and "short horns" to being ineffectual, as illustrated by this earliest known example:
  • A cow is a very good animal in the field; but we turn her out of a garden.
  • The friendly cow all red and white,
    I love with all my heart:
    She gives me cream with all her might
    To eat with apple-tart.
  • I warrant you lay abed till the cows came home.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 145.
  • I never saw a Purple Cow,
    I never hope to see one;
    But I can tell you, anyhow
    * I'd rather see than be one.
  • The Moo-cow-moo's got a tail like a rope
    En it's ravelled down where it grows,
    En it's just like feeling a piece of soap
    All over the moo-cow's nose.
  • You may rezoloot till the cows come home.
  • Thank you, pretty cow, that made
    Pleasant milk to soak my bread.

Bulls[edit]

  • Bullfight critics row on row
    Crowd the vast arena full
    But only one man’s there who knows
    And he's the man who fights the bull.
    • Quoted in a letter to the editor by Representative F. Edward Hébert, chairman of the House Committee on Armed Services, who said, "President Kennedy was fond of quoting some lines from the Spanish poet García Lorca". Reported in The Washington Post (April 11, 1971), p. C7. These lines are believed not to be García Lorca's.
  • I'm as strong as a bull moose and you can use me to the limit.

Oxen[edit]

  • The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib.
    • Isaiah, I, 3.
  • Who drives fat oxen should himself be fat.
    • Samuel Johnson, parody on "Who rules o'er freemen should himself be free," from Henry Brooke's Earl of Essex. In Boswell's Life of Johnson (1784).
  • As an ox goeth to the slaughter.
    • Proverbs, VII, 22. Jeremiah, XI, 19.
  • And the plain ox,
    That harmless, honest, guileless animal,
    In what has he offended? he whose toil,
    Patient and ever ready, clothes the land
    With all the pomp of harvest.

External links[edit]

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