Children's literature

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A mother reads to her children, depicted by Jessie Willcox Smith in a cover illustration of a volume of fairy tales written in the mid to late 19th century.

Children's literature or juvenile literature includes stories, books, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader.

Sourced[edit]

  • Children's literature cannot be created without a close attachment with the children and they should be given moral education through entertainment.
    • Harapriya Barukial Borgohain, writer, upon receiving the Dharmeswar Kataki memorial children's literature award at a ceremony at Tezpur Sahitya Sabha Bhawan — cited in: "Awareness generated on children's literature". Assam Tribune (Guwahati, India: Al Bawaba (Middle East) Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). April 16, 2014. 
  • She does not believe that Wonder Woman tends to masochism or sadism. Furthermore, she believes that even if it did-you can teach either perversion to children-one can only bring out what is inherent in the child. However she did make the reservation that if the woman slaves wore chains (and enjoyed them) for no purpose whatsoever, there would be no point in chaining them.

Secret History of Wonder Woman

  • I read the ones which look to me to be of some interest. I give the rest to the children at Bellevue and let them read them and tell me what they think about them. I give them to teachers, psychiatrists. I take them home to my children. And if there is any question about one, and frequently there is for instance, about 2 years ago one of the psychiatrists wrote me in dismay saying that be, had picked up a comic his daughter brought him which a psychiatrist had been abused in his opinion and found my name on the advisory board and wondered how I could justify such a thing.
In this particular comic the storywriter had thought up a new form of what might be called shock treatment, in which a wife, who was jealous of her husband, had been exposed by the husband, at the advice of his psychiatrist, to actual situations which could be interpreted as indicating that the husband was wanting to do her harm.
But then it ended up with the husband explaining everything and the psychiatrist coming in and explaining everything and the wife and the husband reunited in, their mutual understanding and love, and the psychiatrist going home. He lived next door. The husband played chess with him, or something.
Well, this didn't look very bad to me. I said I was not even sure it was not a good idea, it has some good ideas in it. Maybe if we actually did try to portray some of the delusions of patients and showed we could explain, that might be away of exposing disillusionary ideas.
I showed them to the children in the ward, because they do have disillusonary ideas. The children in the ward thought that was a good story and they thought it was a good idea, it was like the kind of treatment we were giving them, which I had not thought of, in that fashion. They certainly thought it was a good way to cure the sick woman.
  • Mr. Beaser: You mentioned burning flames. Look at this picture here. It shows as a final scene a man being burned. You would object to that being distributed to children, would you not? I gathered that from your last remarks.
Dr. Bender: I would say this: I think I could distribute that to the children. I don't know who the man is. I don't think they know who he is, do they?
Mr. Beaer: Supposing it was a magazine which depicted him as the father of a child, a father figure?
Dr. Bender: Then I would object to it. You see, I objected to this thing about the sailors because it was our sailors.
Mr. Beaser:You would also object maybe to the sight of a child's mother and father being electrocuted?
Dr. Bender: Well, I object to seeing that under any circumstances, if you don't mind.
  • Just creation of children's literature is not enough, we will have to be aware of the wrong spellings and sentence structures. Otherwise, the children wouldn't be satisfied.
    • Harapriya Barukial Borgohain, writer, upon receiving the Dharmeswar Kataki memorial children's literature award at a ceremony at Tezpur Sahitya Sabha Bhawan — cited in: "Awareness generated on children's literature". Assam Tribune (Guwahati, India: Al Bawaba (Middle East) Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). April 16, 2014. 
  • Children's literature often bears clear evidence of its political leanings. Robinson Crusoe (written for adults but appropriated by younger readers) was about a white man who taught a black man how to behave as much as possible like a decent Englishman. The Jungle Book stories feature Mowgli, who learns the law of the jungle then dominates all of them.
    • Jay Heale (November 18, 2013). "Using kid literature to preach equality; Works must carry dream of united SA Works must carry dream of united SA". Pretoria News (South Africa: Independent Online; www.pretorianews.co.za; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 8; Section: news. 
  • Children's literature is not political? What rubbish. If it reflects the society we live in, it is political. For years, the only local books about black children featured them living in a round mud hut in a folktale or wandering around chatting up lions and leopards. Then our authors were gradually allowed by our publishers to dream a little, to speak from the heart.
    • Jay Heale (November 18, 2013). "Using kid literature to preach equality; Works must carry dream of united SA Works must carry dream of united SA". Pretoria News (South Africa: Independent Online; www.pretorianews.co.za; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 8; Section: news. 
  • Children, parents, teachers and schools must always be involved. It is important that good habits and the pleasure of reading can and must be instilled in us when we are young.
    • Atle Hetland (May 9, 2013). "Literature for the people". The Nation (Karachi, Pakistan: Asianet-Pakistan; www.nation.com.pk; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand) 27 (72). 
  • The very first humans anthropomorphized the trees and the sun. It's just what we do. I don't think children's literature is teaching children to graft human emotions onto animals.
    • J. Timothy Hunt, author who uses the pen-name Tim Beiser — cited in: Graham Slaughter (March 28, 2014). "Is Winnie the Pooh hindering children's ability to learn science? Humanlike animals in books can confuse kids, says study, but authors strongly disagree". The Toronto Star (Torstar Syndication Services, a division of Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. L3. 
  • Take a look at George Gamow, who is now recognized as one of the great cosmologists of the last hundred years. I speculate that he probably didn't win the Nobel Prize because people could not take him seriously. He wrote children's books. His colleagues have publicly stated his writing children's books on science had an adverse effect on his scientific reputation, and people could not take him seriously when he and his colleagues proposed that there should be a cosmic background radiation, which we now know to be one of the greatest discoveries of 20th-century physics.
  • Children's literature is a key educational source in creating an inclusive culture.
    • Mark McGlashan, Lancaster University — cited in: Graeme Paton, Education Editor (July 10, 2013). "Same-sex parents 'should be featured in school books'; Children's books used in primary schools should feature same-sex parents to help teach tolerance among youngsters, according to an academic". The Telegraph Online (Telegraph Group Ltd., www.telegraph.co.uk; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). 
  • To my mind, this embracing of what were unambiguously children's characters at their mid-20th century inception seems to indicate a retreat from the admittedly overwhelming complexities of modern existence.
  • A 4-year-old reading a book about a talking bear, or in my case a bear that hugs trees, it's an innocent little fantasy. If a child loves picking up that book every night, I think the positive outweighs the negative - if there is any negative. I'd strongly argue there isn't.
    • Nicholas Oldland, author of Big Bear Hug — cited in: Graham Slaughter (March 28, 2014). "Is Winnie the Pooh hindering children's ability to learn science? Humanlike animals in books can confuse kids, says study, but authors strongly disagree". The Toronto Star (Torstar Syndication Services, a division of Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. L3. 
  • What mostly attracts me to children's literature is how complex it is We often have a misconception that children's literature is literature for adults with simpler language, and happy endings.
    • Victoria Ford Smith, assistant professor at University of Connecticut, specialist in children's literature — cited in: Jill Martin Wrenn (April 28, 2014). "How to keep kids reading through the summer". CNN Wire (CNN; CNN Newsource Sales, Inc.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). 
  • Really, children's literature brings their fears and frustrations to life.
    • Jill Martin Wrenn (April 28, 2014). "How to keep kids reading through the summer". CNN Wire (CNN; CNN Newsource Sales, Inc.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand). 
  • This is one reason why children's literature is so important: it often begins with laughter.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 
  • One of the most common epithets for children's books is 'fun'. It suggests a certain luxurious triviality: what's fun is all that's not serious. And certainly, many books are just that: escapes from the serious business of living.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 
  • This is one of the triumphs of kids' books in general: a bonding in incomprehensibility.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 
  • But all in all, the fun of children's books is often altruistic: it is a lesson in how to cope with an imperfect and often impenetrable life - and, as we chortle together, a form of intimacy.
    • Damon Young (March 22, 2014). "Pain comes before a punchline". The Age (Melbourne, Australia: Fairfax Media Publications Pty Limited. www.theage.com.au.; Accessed via InfoTrac Newsstand): p. 13; Section: Arts and Entertainment. 

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External links[edit]

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