Danish proverbs

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"All want to be lords, but none want to carry the bag." The flag in the middle is the Danish flag. It is surrounded by the flags of the Union between Sweden and Norway.

Proverbs reflecting conventional wisdom in Denmark.

A[edit]

  • Af god begyndelse haabes en god endelse.
    • English: A good beginnings makes a good ending
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "190". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 185. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Af to onde Kaar skal man vaelge det bedste.
    • English equivalent: One should choose the lesser of two evils.
    • "The Democrats are the party that says government will make you smarter, taller, richer, and remove the crabgrass on your lawn. Republicans are the party that says government doesn't work, and then they get elected and prove it."
    • Patrick Jake O'Rourke, Parliament of Whores (1991)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 5. 
  • Alderdom beskytter ikke mod dårskab.
    • English equivalent: Wisdom goes not always by years.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 39. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Alderen zūres med graa haar, men dyden kroner dem.
    • English equivalent: Gray hairs are honorable.
    • "It is the expensiveness of our pleasures that makes the world poor and keeps us poor in ourselves. If we could but learn to find enjoyment in the things of the mind, the economic problems would solve themselves."
    • John Lancaster Spalding, Aphorisms and Reflections (1901)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 35. 
  • Alder er en ond reisebroder.
    • English equivalent: Age and poverty are ill to bear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 177. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Alle ville herrer vǽre, ingen ville sǽkken bǽrre
    • English equivalent: There are too many chiefs and not enough Indians.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 991. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Armod og Kiarlighed ere onde at dölge. (Armod og kærlighed er onde at dølge)
    • English equivalent: Poverty and love are bad to hide.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 50. 
  • Af gammelt jern smedes nye våben.
    • English: From the old comes the new

B[edit]

  • Bange hjarte vandt aldrig fager mö.
    • English equivalent: He is afraid of his own shadow.
    • "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone and as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give others permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others."
    • Marianne Williamson, A Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of "A Course in Miracles" (1992) This famous passage from her book is often erroneously attributed to Nelson Mandela. About the mis-attribution Williamson said, "Several years ago, this paragraph from A Return to Love began popping up everywhere, attributed to Nelson Mandela's 1994 inaugural address. As honored as I would be had President Mandela quoted my words, indeed he did not. I have no idea where that story came from, but I am gratified that the paragraph has come to mean so much to so many people."
    • Variant which appears in the film Coach Carter (2005): "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine as children do. It's not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own lights shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others."
    • Variant which appears in the film Akeelah and the Bee (2006), displayed in a picture frame on the wall, attributing it to Mandela: "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same."
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 130. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • ’’Betre er boie end briste.
    • English equivalent: Better bend than break.
    • "It is better to make some confession, or pay a little deference to others, our neighbors, friends, acquaintances, and especially our superiors, rather than lose our credit or break friendship."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 46. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 16. 
  • Bedre en salt slid over sitt eget bord, end en fersk gedde overet fremmed.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Beder gud dig drage, han får dig vel reb, beder han dig ride.
    • English equivalent: God who gives the wound gives the salve.
    • "There are a thousand forms of evil; there will be a thousand remedies."
    • Ovid, Remedia Amoris, V. 26.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 878. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Betre noget en indet
    • English equivalent: Better something than nothing
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Blind høne kan også finde korn.
    • English equivalent: A blind hen shall find corn.
    • Even someone incompetent will get lucky on occasion.
    • Kjær, Holbek (1969). Ordsprog i Danmark:. J. Paludan. p. 59. 
  • Bǿden sjelv bǿden steg stynker.
    • English equivalent: Proffered service stinks.
    • "...however strong your armies may be, you will always need the favour of the inhabitants to the possession of a province."
    • Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1532), published posthumously
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1149. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Broendt Barn roedes gierne Ilden (Modern Danish: Brændt barn skyr ilden.)
    • English equivalent: Lit: A burnt child dreads the fire. Actual: Those who've had their fingers burned think twice next time"
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 2. 
  • Börn er vis sorg, men uvis gläede.
    • English equivalent: Children are uncertain comforts but certain cares.
    • "Children are bound to cause their parents anxiety, and may or may not also bring them joy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 2 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 654. ISBN 0415096243. 

D[edit]

  • Den der jager to Harer af een busk, får sjældent nogen af dem.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • Meaning: "Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. - Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 102. 
  • Den der kommer først till mølle, får først malet.
    • English equivalent: First come, first served.

 Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 32. 

  • Den där ventär på död mands skoe, går länge barfodet.
    • English equivalent: Don't wait for dead mens shoes.
    • "If thy hope be any thing worth, it will purify thee from thy sins."
    • Joseph Alleine, The Solemn Warnings of the Dead: or, An Admonition to Unconverted Sinners (1804)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 208. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Den hund som bieffer meget, han bider ikkun lidet.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 5. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Des mere man klapper katten, des hǿjere hun bærer rumpen.
    • English equivalent: The more you stroke the cat's tail, the more he raises his back.
    • "Of two friends, one is always the slave of the other, although frequently neither acknowledges the fact to himself."
    • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time. (1840)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1184. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det bedste er det godste fiende.
    • English equivalent: ”Better is the enemy of good.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Det er bedre, at vǽre ene, end at have en ond stallbroder.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 572. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det er en slem Fugl som besmitter sin egen Rede.
    • English equivalent: Don't wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • F. Allen, Maria (2012). The Routledge Portuguese Bilingual Dictionary: Portuguese-English and English-Portuguese. Routledge. p. 439. ISBN 0415434343. 
  • Det er godt, at forlade sig på to ankere.
    • English equivalent: Good riding at two anchors, men have told, for if the one fails, the other may hold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det er ikke godt at holde en ål ved en hale.
    • English equivalent: You might as well try to hold an eel by the tail.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 480. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det er intet hår så lidet, der jo haver sin skygge.
    • English equivalent: Every hair casts its shadow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det mål, I måler med, med skal I self få tilmålt.
    • English equivalent: You will be judged by the standards you judge others by (Judge not, that ye be not judged)

"Judge not, that ye be not judged. For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again." - Matthew 7:1-3 KJV

    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det sker intet nyt under solen.
    • English equivalent: Nothing is new.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1114. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Det stille Vand Har den dybe grund.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 70. 
  • Du skal kravle, før du kan gå.
  • Du skal nog få kärligheden at föle.
    • English equivalent: If you do good, good will be done to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 

E[edit]

  • Een fugl i hånden er bedre end ti på taget
    • English equivalent: One bird in hand is worth two in the bush. (Literally: "One bird in hand is better than ten on the roof").
  • Eder og æg er snart brudne.
    • English equivalent: Eggs and oaths are soon broken.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een skalk ska man fange med en anden.
    • English equivalent: Set a thief to catch a thief.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 74. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • En blind hǿne finder også et korn.
    • English equivalent: Even a blind hen sometimes finds a grain of corn.
    • "An incompetent person or an unsystematic approach is bound to succeed every now and then by chance."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 75. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 36. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • En hest snubler, og har dog fire ben.
    • English equivalent: A good marksman may miss.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 57. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Enhver er sin egen lykkes smed.
    • English equivalent: Every man is the blacksmith of his own happiness.
    • "Just do what the world is telling you to do!"
    • Pamela Fryman, How I Met Your Mother: The Leap (2009)
    • Frellsen, Ulla (1995). Enhver er sin egen lykkes smed. Ulla Frellsen. ISBN 8798366610. 
  • Ethvert kart må stå på sin egen bund.
    • English equivalent: Every bird must hatch its own eggs.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 777. ISBN 0415096243. 

G[edit]

  • Gerrighed er sin egen stedmoder.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Giv skalken et spand, han tager vel heel alen.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he will take a yard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 240. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Gud giver alle dem mad, som han giver mund.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Guld nögle lukker alle Döre op uden Himlens.
  • Gå ikke over åen efter vand.
    • Translation: Don't cross the stream to get water.
    • Larsen (2009). Mørke. Books on Demand. p. 85. ISBN 8776914542. 
  • Gammel kærlighed ruster ikke.
    • English: Literal: Old love never rusts. Actual: Old love never dies.

I[edit]

  • I mørket er alle katte grå.
    • English: Literal: All cats are grey in the dark.
    • In the dark, physical appearance is unimportant. Attributed to Benjamin Franklin.
  • I rǿrt vand er godt at fiske.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • "In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Ikke kan få øje på skoven for bare træer.
    • English equivalent: Can't see the wood for the trees.
    • Harder, T. Mellem to sprog, Museum Tusculanums forlag, K√∏benhavns universitet.
  • Ikke smide barnet ud med badevandet.
    • English equivalent: Don't throw out the baby with the bath water.
    • Fransson, Ola (2009). Kunskapsbehov och nya kompetenser: professioner i förhandling. Books on Demand. p. 134. ISBN 9173350133. 

M[edit]

  • Man fanger flere fluer med en dråbe honning end med en tønde eddike.
    • English equivalent: You can catch more flies with a drop of honey than with a barrel of vinegar.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 100. 
  • Man må hyle med de ulve man er i blandt.
    • English equivalent: "When in Rome do as the Romans."
    • Himmelstrup (2000). Den udødelige soldat og jeg: Ib Michael og hans forfatterskab. Museum Tusculanum forlag. p. 29. ISBN 8772896337. 
  • Man skal smede mens jernet er varmt.
    • English equivalent: Strike while the iron is hot.
    • Hofmann (2011). Hvorfor lugter mine egne prutter bedst. Politiken. ISBN 8740002322. 
  • Mands vilje er mands himmerig.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mennesket agter, men Gud skifter.
    • English equivalent: Everything in its season.
    • "Let no one be slow to seek wisdom when he is young nor weary in search thereof when he is grown old. For no age is too early or too late for the health of the soul. And to say that the season for studying philosophy has not yet come, or that it is past and gone, is like saying that the season for happiness is not yet or that it is now no more."
    • Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Eminent Philosophers, 10.122, in Moral Exhortation (1986), p. 33.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 

H[edit]

  • Han skal have fingre af jern, som fanden vil flaae.
    • English equivalent: Literal: He who has fingers of iron, the devil shall flee. Actual: You need to be strong to beat the devil.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 920. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Han skal have meget smör, som skall stope var mans mund.
    • English equivalent: Literal: He must have a lot of butter in order to stop a mans mouth. Actual: Money buys a man's silence.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 331. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Herregunst, april-veyr, spare-ild, quinde-kier-lighed er ubestandig.
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Hovmod står for fald.
    • English equivalent: Pride comes before fall.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1148. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Hvo der vil honning slikke, må ikke ræddes for bier.
    • English equivalent: Honey is sweet, but the bees sting.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 837. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Hvo som vil gjøre et stort spring, skal gaae vel tilbage.
    • English equivalent: One must step back to take a good leap.
    • "Protect me (Book) from oil, water, insects and loose bonding, and above all, O Lord, protect me from falling into the hands of a fool."
    • A frequent scribal appearing at the end of Ancient Indian manuscript
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 62. 

J[edit]

  • Jo vedlore Blod, jo mindre Hovmod.
    • English equivalent: Good blood always shows itself.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 34. 

K[edit]

  • Koen skal malkes igennem halsen.
    • English equivalent: It's by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • "It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are you industrious about?"
    • Henry David Thoreau, letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857).
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Købe katten i sækken.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one.
    • "I formulate my law, which was wrung out of me after twenty years of wearying defense of science fiction against attacks of people who used the worst examples of the field for ammunition, and whose conclusion was that ninety percent of SF is crud. Using the same standards that categorize 90% of science fiction as trash, crud, or crap, it can be argued that 90% of film, literature, consumer goods, e.tc is crap."
    • Theodore Sturgeon Venture (1957)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 

L[edit]

  • Lid ei på en ander, det du selv kan gjøre.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Lidet er om den mans vrede, som ingen vurder.
    • English equivalent: If you cannot bite, never show your teeth.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ligesom die gamle fugle sienge fore, så hvidse de unge efter.
    • The young birds sings like the old birds.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Läge, hjälp dig selv!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal thyself!
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243. 

M[edit]

  • Mange hug faelder egen.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • Meaning: A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Man må gøre en dyd af nødvendighed.
    • English equivalent: Make a virtue out of necessity.
    • "The opportunity for doing mischief is found a hundred times a day, and of doing good once in a year."
    • Voltaire, Zadig.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1079. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Medens græsset gror, dǿer horsemoer.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243. 

N[edit]

  • Nye koste feje bedst.
    • English equivalent: "New brooms sweep clean."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Når man vil slå hunden finder man lätt en kæpp.
    • English equivalent: A stick is easy found to beat a dog.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 104. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Når den gamle hund gör, skal mn ud at vinduet.'
    • English equivalent: An old dog barks not in vain.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Nöd kommer gammel Kierling til at trave.
    • English equivalent: Needs must go when the devil drives.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60. 

O[edit]

  • Om hundred 'aar er alting glomt.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 48. 
  • Ofte er Ulvesind under Faareskind.
    • English equivalent: Beware of false prophets which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly, they are ravening wolves.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 8. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • Ord slår ikke någon ihjäl.
    • English equivalent: Hard words break no bones.
    • "Do not wonder, if the common people speak more truly than those of high rank; for they speak with more safety."
    • Francis Bacon, Exempla Antithetorum, IX. Laus, Existimatio (Pro.)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 0415160502. 

P[edit]

  • "Pels ikke bjørnen før den er skudt."
    • English equivalent: Don't count your chickens before they hatch.
    • skovforening (1926). Dansk Skovforenings tidsskrift. Dansk Skovforening.. p. 110. 
  • Pris en skön dag om aftenen.
    • English equivalent: Praise the day at dawn.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 200. ISBN 0415160502. 

S[edit]

  • Smedens hest og skomagerens kone har altid de dårligaste sko.
    • English equivalent: The cobbler's wife is the worst shod.
    • "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Som moderen er, så er datteren.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Stille vand har den dybe grunde.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 598. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Store ord gör själdent from gerning.
    • English equivalent: He says the moon is made of cheese.
  • Un menteur est toujours prodigue de serments.
    • "A liar is always lavish of oaths."
    • Pierre Corneille, Le Menteur, III. 5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 92. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Symtom flyger på, men kryber av.
    • English equivalent: Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Säg mig Hven du omgaaes med, og jeg skal sige dig Hvem du er.
  • "Sæt ikke alt på et kort"
    • English equivalent: Don’t put all the eggs in the same basket.
    • "Spread your risks or investments so that if one enterprise fails you will not lose everything."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
  • Söde Ord fylde kun lidt i sakken.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • "Ah, gentle dames! it gars me greet,
To think how mony counsels sweet,
How mony lengthened, sage advices,
The husband frae the wife despises."
    • Robert Burns, "Tam o' Shanter (1793), line 33. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 31. 
    • Source for meaning: Speake, Jennifer; Simpson, John (2009). The Oxford dictionary of proverbs. Oxford University Press. pp. 388. ISBN 0199539537. 
  • Sønen slægter gjerne faderen på.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

T[edit]

  • Temmelig farlig er bedre end den bedste dom.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 68. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tid, ebbe og flod venter ikke på nogen.
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for no man.
    • "Nobody grows old by merely living a number of years; people grow old by deserting their ideals."
    • Samuel Ullman, "Youth," in The Silver Treasury: Prose and Verse for Every Mood (1934), p. 323–24.
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 169. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 723. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tid er penge.
    • English equivalent: Time is money.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tro alle vel, men dig selv bedst.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 699. ISBN 0415096243. 

V[edit]

  • Veien til helvete er brolagt med gode forsetter.
    • English equivalent: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502. 

Æ[edit]

  • Æblet falder ikke langt fra stammen.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Ærlighed varer længst.
    • English equivalent: Honesty is the best policy.
    • "It is a maxim of old that among themselves all things are common to friends."
    • Terence, Adelphoe (The Brothers) (160 B.C)
    • Oehlenschläger (1813). Ærlighed varer længst: idyl. 
  • Æt able som är rödt, er ofta råddent indvendigt.
    • English equivalent: A fair face and a foul heart.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 34. ISBN 0415160502.