Esperanto proverbs

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Esperanto is the biggest constructed language in the world. It was introduced by a Polish ophthalmologist in 1887.

A[edit]

  • Al du sinjoroj samtempe oni servi ne povas.
    • English equivalent: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • Meaning: "One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Al la fiŝo ne instruu naĝarton.
    • English equivalent: Don't try to teach grandma how to suck eggs.
    • Meaning: "Don't teach a fish to swim."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:
  • Amikon montras malfeliĉo.
    • Translation: A friend shows in misfortune.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 159. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Amo kaj puno loĝas komune.
    • English equivalent: Spare the rod and spoil the child.
    • Translation: Love and punishment live together.
    • Meaning: "Discipline (implying strict discipline, including harsh punishment) is necessary to properly raise a child."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:

Ĉ[edit]

  • Ĉiu kreas sian forton, ĉiu forĝas sian sorton.
    • English equivalent: Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
    • Translation: Everyone creates their own strength, everyone forges their own destiny.
    • Meaning: "In shaping one's own fortune one should not rely on the help of others, as they are also concerned mainly about their own matters."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 388. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

E[edit]

  • Eĉ ŝtono verdiĝas, se ĝi longe ne moviĝas.
    • English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • Translation: Even a stone turns green if it does not move for a long time.
    • Meaning: "There are a Set of People in the World unfettled that before they are well enter’d upon one Bufinefs, dip into another, and before they are well fettled in one Habitation, remove to another."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • En akvo malklara oni fiŝkaptas facile.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • Translation: In muddy water one catches fish easily
    • Meaning: "In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

F[edit]

  • Fiŝo pli granda malgrandan englutas.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Translation: A bigger fish devours a smaller one.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

K[edit]

  • Kia patrino, tia filino.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kia patro, tia filo.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kiam kato promenas, la musoj festenas.
    • English equivalent: When the cat's away the mice will play.
    • Translation: When a cat goes out for a walk, the mice throw a party.
    • Meaning: "."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:
  • Kiam nokto vualas, ĉiuj koloroj egalas.
    • English equivalent: All cats are grey in the dark.
    • Translation: When the veil of night falls, all colors are equal.
    • Meaning: "."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:

L[edit]

  • La manĝota fiŝo estas ankoraŭ en la rivero.
    • English equivalent: Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.
    • Translation: The fish that will be eaten is still in the river.
    • Meaning: Don't count on resources such as future earnings or crops that you don't yet have in your possession. In English, the proverb comes from Aesop's Fables. A woman carrying a basket of eggs fantasizes about what she will do with the money she earns from the chickens that will hatch from the eggs, until she trips, spills the basket and breaks all the eggs, thereby removing any chance for income.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:

N[edit]

  • Ne en unu tago elkreskis Kartago.
    • English equivalent: Rome wasn't built in a day.
    • Translation: Carthage didn't raise up in only one day.
    • Meaning: Large enterprises take time to build
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Felix Woolf (1982). English phrases and expressions in Esperanto. p. 90. 
  • Ne falas frukto malproksime de l'arbo.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Ne kotas besto en sia nesto.
    • English equivalent: It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest; Don't wash your dirty linen in public.
    • Meaning: "Why wantonly proclaim one's own disgrace, or expose the faults or weaknesses of one's kindred or people?"
    • Second meaning: "It is considered contemptible to defy the rule of solidarity by revealing facts harmful to the group one belongs to."
    • Source for first meaning: Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 109. 
    • Source for second meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "106". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 466. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Ne venas mont' al monto, sed homo homon renkontas.
    • English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a human meets a human.
    • Meaning: "There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet." or "Once can always find a possibility for revenge."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

P[edit]

  • Parolo estas arĝento, oron similas silento.
    • English equivalent: Speech is silver, but silence is gold.
    • Meaning: "."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:
  • Plej granda potenco kuŝas en la komenco.
    • English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending.
    • Meaning: "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Plej juna katido musojn jam pelas.
    • English equivalent: A good dog hunts by instinct.
    • Meaning: "."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:
  • Pomo ĉiun tagon forturnas malsanon.
    • English equivalent: An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
    • Meaning: "."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:
  • Por sperto kaj lerno ne sufiĉas eterno.
    • English equivalent: We are to learn as long as we live.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 182. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

S[edit]

  • Se iu ne volas labori, tiu ankaŭ ne manĝu.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: "Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work."
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Silento estas konsento.
    • English equivalent: Silence means consent.
    • "Those who do not reply to a request or accusation, or who raise no objection to something said or done, are assumed to have acquiesced."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 244. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "94". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 430. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

T[edit]

  • Tra unu orelo, eniras, tra la dua eliras.
    • English equivalent: In at one ear and out at the other; Advice most needed are the least heeded.
    • Meaning: "For various reasons a good advice or a genuine warning is often disregarded or considered of no importance."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

U[edit]

  • Unu hako kverkon ne faligas.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • Meaning: "A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

V[edit]

  • Venĝo estas plado manĝita malvarme.
    • English equivalent: Revenge is a dish best served cold
    • Meaning: "."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs:

See also[edit]