Latin proverbs

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This is a list of Latin proverbs and sayings.

A B C D E F G H I or J L M N O P Q R S T U VSee alsoReferences

A[edit]

  • Abbati, medico, patronoque intima pande.
    • Do not keep secrets from your clergyman, your physician, or your patron.
  • Abyssus abyssum invocat.
    • Deep calls to deep.
  • Acquirit qui tuetur.
    • He acquires who preserves.
      • Compare: "Sparing is the first gaining"
  • Acta non verba
    • Actions, not words.
  • Amicorum omnia communia
    • Between friends all is common
    • Variant translation: For friends, all things are shared
  • Ancipiti plus ferit ense gula.
    • Gluttony slays more than the sword.
    • Compare: "Wine has drowned more than the sea."
  • Aegrescere medendo.
    • To be made sick by medicine.
  • Aeque pars ligni curvi ac recti valet igni.
    • A piece of bent wood and a piece of straight wood are equally suitable for the fire.
      • Compare: "Crooked logs make straight fires."
  • Age quod agis.
    • "Do what you do"; suggesting "That which you do, do well."
  • Aliquis in omnibus est nullus in singulis.
    • Someone in all, is nothing in one.
    • English equivalent: Jack of all trades, master of none.
  • Amat victoria curam
    • Victory loves diligence
  • Aquila non capit muscas
    • An eagle does not catch flies.
  • Audentes fortuna iuvat
    • Fortune favours the bold.

B[edit]

  • Bene diagnoscitur, bene curatur.
    • Well diagnosed, well cured.
  • Bis dat qui cito dat.
    • He gives twice who gives quickly.
  • Bonum est iniurias oblivisci.
    • It is good to forget wrongs.
  • Brevis oratio penetrat coelos
    • Short prayers reach heaven.

C[edit]

  • Carpe diem.
    • "Seize the day."
      • Horace, Odes I.11.8
      • Note: The verb "carpere" has the literal meaning "to pick, to pluck," particularly in reference to the picking of fruits and flowers, and was used figuratively by the Roman poets to mean "to enjoy, use, make use of."
  • Cave ab homine unius libri.
    • Beware the man of one book.
  • Citius venit malum quam revertitur.
    • Evil arrives faster than it leaves.
  • Cito maturum cito putridum.
    • Quickly ripe, quickly rotten.
  • Cogitationes posteriores sunt saniores.
    • Second thoughts are ever wiser.
  • Consuetudinis magna vis est.
    • Great is the power of habit.
      • Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II; English translation by Andrew P. Peabody
  • Contritionem praecedit superbia.
  • Corruptio optimi pessima est
    • The corruption of the best is the worst
  • Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges.
    • The most corrupt republic, the most laws.
    • (Tacitus) Annals (117)
  • Corvus oculum corvi non eruit
    • A raven does not pluck out the eyes of another raven.
  • Cui caput dolet, omnia membra languent.
    • English equivalent: When the head is sick, the whole body is sick.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1117. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cuilibet fatuo placet sua calva.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "147". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Cuiusvis hominis est errare, nullius nisi insipientis in errore perseverare.
    • Any man can make a mistake; only a fool keeps making the same one.
    • Marcus Tullius Cicero, Philippica XII, ii, 5
  • Curae canitiem inducunt.
    • Worry brings grey hair.

D[edit]

  • Deus quem punire vult dementat.
    • Whom God wishes to destroy, he first makes mad.
  • Diem vesper commendat.
    • "The evening compliments the day"
    • Compare: You don't know what you've got till it's gone.
  • Dii facientes adiuvant.
    • The gods aid the active.
  • Dives aut iniquus est, aut iniqui haeres.
    • A rich man is either a knave, or the heir of a knave.
      • Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims and Mottos, edited by H. T. Riley [1]
  • Dives est qui sibi nihil deesse putat.
    • The rich man is the one who thinks to himself that nothing is lacking.
  • Docendo discimus.
    • By teaching we learn.
      • Compare: Homines dum docent discunt. "Men learn while they teach." Seneca the Younger, Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium; Book I, letter 7, section 8
  • Ductus exemplo
    • "Leading by example"
  • Dulce bellum inexpertis
    • War is sweet to those who have never experienced it.
  • Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.
    • Sweet and honorable it is, to die for the fatherland.
  • Dulce pomum quum abest custos.
    • Translation: Sweet is the apple when the keeper is away.
    • English equivalent: Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
    • Meaning: "Things that you must not have or do are always the most desirable."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • János Erdélyi (1851). Magyar közmondások könlyve. Nyomatott Kozma Vazulnál. p. 169. 
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 93. 
  • Duo lepores qui insequitur, neutrum capit
    • Who chases two rabbits, catches neither.
  • Dum anima est, spes est
    • While there is life there is hope.
      • Compare: Aegroto dum anima est, spes esse dicitur (There is said to be hope for a sick man, as long as there is life); Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum (Letters to Atticus) Book IX, Letter X, section 3
  • Dum spiro, spero.
    • "While I breathe, I hope."
  • Dum vivimus, vivamus!
    • While we live, let us live!
    • Organization) (1972). Dum Vivimus, Vivamus: A Chronicle of the First Century of the Knights of Momus, 1872-1972. 

E[edit]

  • Effectus sequitir causam.
    • Effects follow causes.
  • Eodem cubito, eadem trutina, pari libra.
    • Translation: The elbow, the same balance, an equal balance.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Errare humanum est
    • To err is human
  • Ex granis fit acervus.
    • A heap is made from grains.
  • Ex malis moribus bonae leges natae sunt.
    • Bad customs have given birth to good laws.
  • Ex nihilo nihil fit.
    • Nothing comes from nothing.
  • Exceptio probat regulam
    • The exception proves the rule
  • Extremis malis extrema remedia.
    • Extreme remedies for extreme ills.
  • Expecta bos olim herba.
    • Expect a cow where there is grass.

F[edit]

  • Facilis descensus Averno.
    • The descent to hell is easy.
  • Festina lente
    • Make haste slowly.
  • Fides facit fidem.
    • Confidence begets confidence.
  • Fide nemini
    • Trust no one.
  • Finis origine pendet.
    • The end depends on the beginning.
  • Forma boni fragilis est.
    • The form of the good is fragile
    • Compare: All that is fair must fade.
  • Fraus hominum ad perniciem, et integritas ad salutem vocat.
    • Deceit summons danger and honesty brings safety.
  • Fronti nulla fides.
    • No faith in appearances.

G[edit]

  • Generosus equus non curat canem latrantem.
    • The well bred horse ignores the barking dog.
  • Gutta cavat lapidem non vi, sed saepe cadendo
    • A drop hollows out the stone not by strength, but falling many times.

H[edit]

  • Historia est vitae magistra.
    • "History is the teacher of life.”
  • Hodie mihi, cras tibi.
    • To me today, to you tomorrow.
  • Fere homines libenter id quod volunt credunt.
    • Often, men freely believe that which they wish.
  • Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto.
  • Honor sequitur fugientem.
    • Honor follows the one who flees from her.
      • The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations [2]
  • Hostium munera, non munera.

I[edit]

  • Ignavum fortuna repugnat.
    • Fortune disdains the lazy.
  • Ignorantia legis non excusat
    • Ignorance of the law is no excuse.
  • Improbe Neptunum accusat, qui iterum naufragiam facit.
    • He unjustly blames Neptune, who suffers shipwreck twice.
  • In dubio abstine
    • When in doubt, abstain.
  • In iudicando criminosa est celeritas.
    • Haste in judging is shameful.
  • In eadam sumus navi
    • We are in the same boat.
  • In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas
    • "In necessary things unity, in doubtful things liberty, in all things kindness"
  • In nullum avarus bonus est, in se pessimus.
    • The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
  • In propria causa nemo debet esse iudex.
    • No one should be the judge in his own trial.
  • In vino veritas.
    • In wine there is truth.
  • Inimicum quamvis humilem metuendum est
    • An enemy, however small, is to be feared.
    • Compare English proverb: Do not underestimate your opponent.
  • Innumeras curas secum adferunt liberi.
    • Children bring with them countless cares.
  • Interdum stultus bene loquitur.
    • Sometimes a fool speaks well.
  • Ira furor brevis est.
    • Anger is brief insanity
    • Horace, Epistles, Book I, epistle ii, line 62

L[edit]

  • "Latet enim veritas, sed nihil pretiosius veritate"
  • Lumen soli mutuum das.
    • Translation: You are lending light to the sun.
    • Note: Said of persons who affect to explain what is perfectly clear and intelligible.

M[edit]

  • Mala herba cito crescit
    • An ill weed grows apace.
  • Mali principii malus finis.
    • Bad beginnings lead to bad results.
  • Malum consilium est, quod mutari non potest.
    • It is a bad plan, which can not be changed.
  • Malum quidem nullum esse sine aliquo bono.
    • "There is, to be sure, no evil without something good."
  • Manus manum lavat
    • "One hand washes the other."
  • Mater artium necessitas.
    • "Necessity is the mother of invention"
  • Maxima debetur puero reverentia
    • "The greatest respect is owed to children"
  • Medicus curat, natura sanat
    • Translation: "The doctor cares [for his patient], nature heals [him]." or "Doctor cures, nature saves”
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 869. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Melius est nomen bonum quam divitae multae.
    • A good name is better than great riches.
  • Mendax memorem esse oportet.
    • A liar should have a good memory.
  • Misera fortuna, qui caret inimico.
    • It is unfortunate to have no enemies.
  • Mobiles ad superstitionem perculsae semel mentes
  • Mulier est hominis confusio.
    • Woman is the ruin of man.
  • Multum clamoris, parum lanae.
    • Much clamor, little wool.
  • Mundus vult decipi
    • The world wants to be deceived

N[edit]

  • Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
    • Expect nothing from friends, do what you can do yourself.
  • Nemo regere potest nisi qui et regi.
    • No one is able to rule unless he is also able to be ruled.
  • Nescis quid serus vesper vehat.
    • "You know not what night-fall may bring."
  • Nihil ægrius quam disciplinam accipimus.
    • We receive nothing with so much reluctance as instruction.
  • Non alios suo modulo metire.
    • Do not judge others by your own yardstick.
  • Nocere facile est, prodesse difficile.
    • It is easy to harm, it is difficult to help.
  • Non nobis solum nati sumus
    • We are not born for ourselves alone.
      • Cicero, De Officiis', Book I, section 22
  • Non quia difficilia sunt non audemus, sed quia non audemus, difficilia sunt.
    • "It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, but because we do not dare that things are difficult."
      • Seneca, Letters to Lucilius, letter 104, section 26, line 5
  • Non semper erit aestas.
    • "It will not always be summer."
  • Nulla poena, nulla lex.
    • "No penalty, no law."
  • Nulla regula sine exceptione.
    • There is no rule without an exception.
  • Nullus est liber tam mallus, ut non aliqua parte prosit.

O[edit]

  • Oblata arripe.
    • Take what is given.
  • Oculus animi index.
    • The eye is the informer/spy of the mind.
  • Omnia cum pretio.
    • Everything with a price.
      • From Juvenal, Satires, III, 183-184 Omnia Romae cum pretio (Everything in Rome with a price)
  • Omnia vincit amor
    • Love conquers all
  • Oratores fuint, poetae nascuntur.
    • Orators are made, poets are born.
  • Optimi natatores saepius submerguntur.
    • The best swimmers often drown.
  • Optimum medicamentum quies est.
    • Rest is the best medicine.
  • Otii vitia negotio discuti
    • The ills of leisure are cured by labour.
  • Otium dat vitium.
    • Leisure breeds vice.
      • Compare English proverb: "The devil will find work for idle hands"

P[edit]

  • Pacta sunt servanda
    • Translation: "Agreements must be honoured.”
    • Hasan, A. M. (2005). Pacta sunt servanda: the principle and its application in petroleum production sharing contract, Fikahati Aneska.
  • Parit enim conversatio contemptum.
    • Familiarity breeds contempt.
  • Pars est beneficii quod petitur si cito neges.
    • Translation: A prompt refusal has in part the grace of a favour granted.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 147. 
  • Pauca sed matura
    • Few, but ripe.
  • Periculum in mora
    • There is danger in delay.
  • Piscem vorat maior minorem.
    • The larger fish eats the smaller.
      • Proverbs: A Handbook [3], Wolfgang Mieder
  • Praemonitus, praemunitus
    • "Forewarned is forearmed"
  • Praesentem mulge, fugientem quid insequeris.
    • Translation: Milk today, for what you are aiming for is fleeing.
    • English equivalent: One today is worth two tomorrows.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Praestat cautela quam medela.
    • Caution is better than cure.
  • Publica fama non semper vana.
    • Rumour is not always false.
  • Pulverulenta novis bene verritur area scopis.
    • English equivalent: "New brooms sweep clean."
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 

Q[edit]

  • Qualis rex, talis grex
    • As the king, so the people.
  • Quam magnum vectigal sit parsimonia
    • How great a revenue parsimony can be
      • Cicero, Paradoxa Stoicorum; Paradox VI, 49
  • Quem di diligunt, adulescens moritur
    • "Whom the gods love dies young"
  • Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    • "Who shall watch the watchmen?"
  • Qui dormit non peccat.
    • "He who sleeps does not sin."
  • Qui habet aures audiendi audiat
  • Qui non est hodie, cras minus aptus erit.
    • Who is not ready today, will be less so tomorrow.
  • Qui me amat, amat et canem meam.
    • Who loves me, loves even my dog.
  • Qui audet adipiscitur.
    • He succeeds who dares.
  • Qui multum habet, plus cupit.
    • He who has much desires more.
  • Qui non proficit, deficit.
    • Who does not advance, recedes.
  • Qui pro innocente dicit, satis est eloquens.
    • He who speaks for the innocent is eloquent enough.
  • Qui rogat, non errat.
    • Who asks, doesn't err.
  • Qui scribit, bis legit.
    • Who writes, reads twice.
  • Qui tacet consentire videtur
    • Who is silent, is seen as consenting.
  • Qui vitulum tollit, taurum subduxerit idem.
    • Who steals a calf will steal an ox.
  • Qui vult dare parva non debet magna rogare.
    • Who is willing to give only little, should not ask for much.
  • Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur.
    • Whatever is said in Latin, appears profound.
  • Quieta non movere
    • Do not disturb what is settled.
  • Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur.
  • Quod nocet, saepe docet
    • What harms, often teaches.
  • Quod non videt oculus, cor non dolet.
    • What the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve.

R[edit]

  • Rem tene, verba sequentur.
    • Grasp the subject and the words will follow.
  • Repetitio est mater studiorum.
    • Repetition is the mother of study.

S[edit]

  • Salus populi suprema lex esto.
    • Let the welfare of the people be the highest law.
      • Cicero, De Legibus; Book III
  • Sapere aude
    • Dare to be wise.
      • Horace, Epistles; Book I, epistle 2, line 40
  • Sapiens omnia sua secum portat
    • "A wise man takes everything he owns with himself." (i.e. in his head; his wisdom)
  • Sapientia est potentia
    • Wisdom is power.
  • Scientia non habet inimicum nisi ignorantem.
    • Knowledge has no enemies but the ignorant.
  • Sicut mater, ita et filia eius.
    • "As the mother, so is her daughter."
    • Compare English proverb "Like father, like son"
  • Si fueris Romae, Romano vivito more, si fueris alibi, vivito sicut ibi.
    • If you are in Rome, live in the Roman way, if you are somewhere else, live like there.
      • Derived from Ambrose of Milan
      • Compare English proverb "When in Rome, do as the Romans do"
  • Si vis amari, ama
    • If you wish to be loved, love.
  • Si vis pacem, para bellum.
  • Silent enim leges inter arma
    • Laws are silent in the midst of arms.
      • Cicero, Pro Milone, Chapter IV, section 11
  • Simia est simia, etiamsi purpura vestiatur.
    • An ape is an ape, even if dressed in purple.
    • Note: Purple was associated with royalty
  • Stultorum est se alienis immiscere negotiis.
    • It is foolish to become involved in another's work.
      • Compare English: Mind your own business
  • Summum ius summa inuria.
    • The highest law is the highest wrong.
      • Cicero, De officiis I, section 33
  • Sunt facta verbis difficiliora
    • Works are harder than words [4]
      • Cicero, Epistulae Ad Quintum Fratrem, letter 4
      • English equivalent: "Easier said than done"
  • Sunt pueri pueri pueri puerilia tractant
    • Children are children and children do childish things [5]
    • English equivalent: "Boys will be boys"
  • Suum cuique
    • To each his own

T[edit]

  • Tarde venientibus ossa.
    • Translation: "For those who come late, only the bones."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 625. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tempora aptari decet.
    • Translation: Times should be adapted to.
    • English equivalent: Take things as you find them.
    • "We should not plan and then try to make circumstances fit those plans. Instead we should make plans fit the circumstances."
    • George S. Patton, War as I Knew It (1947)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Tempori parce!
    • Translation: "Save time!"
    • Gottlob Zumpt, Karl (1836). A grammar of the Latin language (4 ed.). B. Fellowes. p. 275. 
  • Tempus fugit.
    • Translation: "Time flees." (i.e., "time flies"). Originally as Sed fugit interea, fugit irreparabile tempus - translation: "Meanwhile the irreplaceable time flees" (Virgil)
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for none.
    • Almond, Frank (2002). Tempus Fugit. C&M Online Media. ISBN 0917990501. 
  • Timendi causa est nescire.
    • Translation: "The cause of fear is ignorance." (Seneca)
    • R. Stone, Jon (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings (illustrerad ed.). Routledge. p. 118. ISBN 0415969093. 
  • Tres faciunt collegium.
    • Translation: "Three makes a company."
    • Berger, Adolf (1953). Encyclopedic Dictionary of Roman Law, Volym 43 Transactions of the American Philosophical Society. American Philosophical Society. p. 742. ISBN 0871694328. 
  • Tunc tua res agitur, paries cum proximus ardet.
    • Translation: "It also concerns you when the nearest wall is burning."
    • R. Stone, Jon (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings (illustrerad ed.). Routledge. p. 119. ISBN 0415969093. 
  • Tutum silentii premium.
    • There is safety in silence.

U[edit]

  • Ut salutas, ita salutaberis
    • As you preserve, so shall you be preserved.
  • Ubi bene, ibi patria
    • Translation: "Where one feels good, there is one's country."
    • Adeleye, Gabriel (1999). World Dictionary of Foreign Expressions: A Resource for Readers and Writers. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. p. 389. ISBN 0865164231. 
  • Ubi concordia, ibi victoria.
    • Translation: "Where there is harmony, there is victory."
    • Webb, Amy (2006). The Devil's Duty. Lulu.com. pp. 212. ISBN 1411649842. 
  • Ubi dubium, ibi libertas.
    • Translation: "Where there is doubt, there is freedom." legal, meaning when in doubt the prisoner has to be freed.
    • Greener, Richard (2006). The Lacey Confession. Llewellyn Worldwide. p. 420. ISBN 0738708704. 
  • Ubi fumus, ibi ignis.
    • Translation: "Where there's smoke, there's fire."
    • Meaning: Where there are the signs of something, something is there.
    • Thomasius, Christian (1715). Cautelae circa doctrinam de praesumptione allodialitatis. p. 29. 
  • Ulula cum lupis, cum quibus esse cupis.
    • Howl with the wolves, if you wish to be among them.
  • Uni navi ne committas omnia.
    • Translation: Do not commit all to one boat.
    • English equivalent: Don't put all your eggs in the same basket.
    • Meaning: "Spread your risks or investments so that if one enterprise fails you will not lose everything."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 715. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Una hirundo non facit ver
    • "One swallow doesn't make spring"
  • Unum castigabis, centum emendabis.
    • Translation: For one reprimand, a hundred corrections."
    • Lautenbach, Ernst (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 129. ISBN 3825856526. 
  • Usus magister est optimus.
    • "Experience is the best teacher"
  • Ut ameris, amabilis esto.
    • "That you may be loved, be lovable."
      • Ovid, Ars Amatoria; Book II, line 107
  • Ut desint vires, tamen est laudanda voluntas
    • Though strength be lacking, yet the will is to be praised.
  • Ut sementem feceris, ita metes.
    • You shall reap as you have sown.
      • Spoken by Rusca according to Cicero in De Oratore II, 65
      • Compare: Job 4:8 and Galatians 6:7.
  • Ut sis nocte levis, sit cena brevis!
    • Translation: "That your sleeping hour be peaceful, let your dining hour be brief!" (Sis is one hour before sunset.) (modern: Sleep hard, Sleep fast, Sleep well)
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 818. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Uxor formosa et vinum sunt dulcia venena.
    • "Beautiful women and wine are sweet venom."
    • Beudel, Paul (1911). Qua ratione Graeci liberos docuerint, papyris, ostracis, tabulis in Aegypto inventis illustratur: commentationem philologicam. E Typographia Aschendorffiana. p. 32. 

V[edit]

  • Vade ad formicam
    • Go to the ant
      • From Book of Proverbs 6:6; the full phrase reading: "Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise: Which having no guide, overseer, or ruler, Provideth her meat in the summer, and gathereth her food in the harvest."
  • Varitatio delectat
    • English equivalent: Variety is the spice of life.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 89. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Vasa vana plurimum sonant
    • Hollow vessels make the most sound.
  • Ventis secundis, tene cursum.
    • English equivalent: Go with the flow.
    • "Water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows. Let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances."
    • Tzu, Sun (̃¨ 400 B.C). "VI. Weak Points and Strong". The Art of War. 
    • Mesiah, Leza M. (2007). Recipes for Recovery: How to Heal Loss and a Broken Heart. AuthorHouse. p. 138. ISBN 1425965954. 
  • Verba docent, exempla trahunt.
    • Translation: Words instruct, illustrations lead.
    • Rautenberg, Wolfgang (2009). A Concise Introduction to Mathematical Logi (3, illustrerad ed.). Springer. p. 58. ISBN 1441912207. 
  • Verba volant, scripta manent.
    • Words fly, writings remain.
  • Verit eo caudam, qua decidit arbore, malum.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Veritas liberabit vos
  • Veritatem dies aperit.
    • Translation: Time discloses the truth.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1206. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vincit omnia veritas
    • Truth conquers all.
  • Vincit qui patitur
    • He conquers who endures.
  • Vipera in veprecula est.
    • There is a viper in the bush.
      • Note: Said of hidden danger
  • Vivit post funera virtus.
    • Translation: Virtue survives the grave.
    • Henry Thomas Riley (1856). Dictionary of Latin Quotations, Proverbs, Maxims, and Mottos, Classical and Mediaeval. p. 503. 
  • Vulpes pilum mutat, non mores!
    • English equivalent A leopard won't change its spots.
    • Lautenbach, Ernst (2002). Latein-Deutsch: Zitaten-Lexikon: Quellennachweise. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 425. ISBN 3825856526. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • O'Shea, Stephen (2000). The Perfect Heresy: The Revolutionary Life and Death of the Medieval Cathars. ISBN 0-8027-1350-5.
  • Jenny's First Year Latin

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]