Tolerance

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Tolerance or toleration indicates a fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward those whose opinions, practices, race, religion, nationality, etc., differ from one's own, especially evident in deliberate opposition to bigotry.

Quotes[edit]

People who are intolerant, categorize and over-react... should all be dragged against a wall and shot. ~ Arthur M. Jolly
  • Not the power to remember, but its very opposite, the power to forget, is a necessary condition for our existence.
  • Sometimes true tolerance requires an extraordinary strength, which we are often too weak to exercise.
    • Fausto Cercignani in: Brian Morris, Quotes we cherish. Quotations from Fausto Cercignani, 2014, p. 29.
  • I could say analogously that tolerance is the affable appreciation of qualities, views, and actions of other individuals which are foreign to one`s own habits, beliefs, and tastes. Thus being tolerant does not mean being indifferent towards the actions and feelings of others. Understanding and empathy must also be present....
  • The responsibility of tolerance lies with those who have the wider vision
  • I am a lover of truth, a worshipper of freedom, a celebrant at the altar of language and purity and tolerance. That is my religion, and every day I am sorely, grossly, heinously and deeply offended, wounded, mortified and injured by a thousand different blasphemies against it. When the fundamental canons of truth, honesty, compassion and decency are hourly assaulted by fatuous bishops, pompous, illiberal and ignorant priests, politicians and prelates, sanctimonious censors, self-appointed moralists and busy-bodies, what recourse of ancient laws have I? None whatever. Nor would I ask for any. For unlike these blistering imbeciles my belief in my religion is strong and I know that lies will always fail and indecency and intolerance will always perish.
    • Stephen Fry, in his "Trefusis Blasphemes" radio broadcast, as published in Paperweight (1993)
  • Suppose there should be a law made that all black men should be imprisoned, it would be unreasonable. We have as little reason to quarrel with other men for being of different opinions than as for being of different complexions.
  • People who are intolerant, categorize and over-react... should all be dragged against a wall and shot.
  • Theological condemnation of others, which breaks off fellowship in either judgment or contempt, is impermissible.
  • ...neither tolerance nor intolerance is grounded in science and reason, but they are themselves acts of faith grounded in social custom and the politics of expediency and power
    • John Money, Homosexuality: Bipotenitality, Terminology, and History
  • Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. [...] We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant.
  • Let us now consider whether justice requires the toleration of the intolerant, and if so under what conditions. There are a variety of situations in which this question arises. Some political parties in democratic states hold doctrines that commit them to suppress the constitutional liberties whenever they have the power. Again, there are those who reject intellectual freedom but who nevertheless hold positions in the university. It may appear that toleration in these cases is inconsistent with the principles of justice, or at any rate not required by them.
    • John Rawls, “Toleration of the intolerant,” A Theory of Justice (1971), p. 216
  • An intolerant sect has no right to complain when it is denied an equal liberty. ... A person’s right to complain is limited to principles he acknowledges himself.
    • John Rawls, “Toleration of the intolerant,” A Theory of Justice (1971), p. 217
  • The doctrine of toleration requires a positive as well as a negative statement. It is not only wrong to burn a man on account of his creed, but it is right to encourage the open avowal and defence of every opinion sincerely maintained. Every man who says frankly and fully what he thinks is so far doing a public service. We should be grateful to him for attacking most unsparingly our most cherished opinions.
  • When you speak in His presence about your past sins, He does not even understand your language. Only the present and the future have any interest for Him. ... .I have committed crimes and have blood on my conscience. I told Jesus about it again and again. But because He had long ago washed all this away, there was no possibility of communication between us. He did not understand what I was talking about.

External links[edit]

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