Equinox

From Wikiquote
(Redirected from Æquinox)
Jump to: navigation, search
The night of time far surpasseth the day, and who knows when was the Æquinox? ~ Thomas Browne

Equinox (Latin: aequus, equal + nox, night) refers to a moment when the Sun is perpendicular to the Equator of the Earth, and the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are equally illuminated; this occurs twice a year, first, around the 20th of March with the Sun progressing northward, as the Spring or vernal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere and the Fall or autumnal equinox in the Southern, and around the 22th of September, with the Sun proceeding southward, as the autumnal equinox of the Northern, and the vernal equinox of the Southern.

Quotes[edit]

When the equinox entered Pisces, the Savior of the World "appeared as the Fisher of Men." ~ Benson Bobrick
  • At the equinox when the earth was veiled in a late rain, wreathed with wet poppies, waiting spring
    The ocean swelled for a far storm and beat its boundary, the ground-swell shook the beds of granite.

    I gazing at the boundaries of granite and spray, the established sea-marks, felt behind me
    Mountain and plain, the immense breadth of the continent, before me the mass and double stretch of water.

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: