April 27

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Quotes of the day from previous years:

When a thing has been said, and said well, have no scruple. Take it and copy it. ~ Anatole France
Independence I have long considered as the grand blessing of life, the basis of every virtue; and independence I will ever secure by contracting my wants, though I were to live on a barren heath. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft (born 27 April 1759)
The winds and waves are always on the side of the ablest navigators. ~ Edward Gibbon (born 27 April 1737 O.S. but actually 8 May in the Gregorian Calendar — confusions existed when this choice was made.)
Though I have been trained as a soldier, and participated in many battles, there never was a time when, in my opinion, some way could not be found to prevent the drawing of the sword. I look forward to an epoch when a court, recognized by all nations, will settle international differences. ~ Ulysses S. Grant
The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools. ~ Herbert Spencer
No man chooses evil because it is evil; he only mistakes it for happiness, the good he seeks. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft
It is justice, not charity, that is wanting in the world. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft
The same energy of character which renders a man a daring villain would have rendered him useful to society, had that society been well organized. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft
I know no method to secure the repeal of bad or obnoxious laws so effective as their stringent execution. ~ Ulysses S. Grant
Freedom and justice cannot be parceled out in pieces to suit political convenience.
~ Coretta Scott King ~
The current opinion that science and poetry are opposed is a delusion. … Think you that a drop of water, which to the vulgar eye is but a drop of water, loses any thing in the eye of the physicist who knows that its elements are held together by a force which, if suddenly liberated, would produce a flash of lightning? Think you that what is carelessly looked upon by the uninitiated as a mere snow-flake does not suggest higher associations to one who has seen through a microscope the wondrously varied and elegant forms of snow-crystals? Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? … The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded.
~ Herbert Spencer ~
Nothing, I am sure, calls forth the faculties so much as the being obliged to struggle with the world.
~ Mary Wollstonecraft ~
Rank or add further suggestions…

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.


Progress, therefore, is not an accident, but a necessity. Instead of civilization being artificial, it is part of nature; all of a piece with the development of the embryo or the unfolding of a flower. ~ Herbert Spencer (born April 27, 1820)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:27, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:57, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:56, 25 April 2008 (UTC) with a strong lean toward 4.

The fact disclosed by a survey of the past that majorities have usually been wrong, must not blind us to the complementary fact that majorities have usually not been entirely wrong. ~ Herbert Spencer

In my view, the composer, just as the poet, the sculptor or the painter, is in duty bound to serve Man, the people. He must beautify human life and defend it. He must be a citizen first and foremost, so that his art might consciously extol human life and lead man to a radiant future. Such is the immutable code of art as I see it. ~ Sergei Prokofiev (born April 27, 1891)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:27, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 22:57, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:56, 25 April 2008 (UTC) with a lean toward a 4.

They who in folly or mere greed
Enslaved religion, markets, laws,
Borrow our language now and bid
Us to speak up in freedom's cause.
~ Cecil Day Lewis (born April 27, 1904)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 18:27, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 22:57, 25 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 23:56, 25 April 2008 (UTC) with a very strong lean toward 4.

When they deliver you up, take no thought how or what ye shall speak: for it shall be given you in that same hour what ye shall speak.
For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit of your Father which speaketh in you. And the brother shall deliver up the brother to death, and the father the child: and the children shall rise up against their parents, and cause them to be put to death. And ye shall be hated of all men for my name's sake: but he that endureth to the end shall be saved. ~ Yeshua (Jesus Christ) (Eastern Orthodox Easter 2008)

  • 2 Kalki 01:58, 24 April 2009 (UTC) * 4 Kalki 23:56, 25 April 2008 (UTC) no longer strongly related to the date.
  • 2 but I would have given it a 3 if it were trimmed to the last bit of the quote. I like this quote because it speaks of determination, a respectable quality, to endure and be saved in turn. Zarbon 00:03, 26 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 21:47, 26 April 2009 (UTC)

What I did in my youth is hundreds of times easier today. Technology breeds crime. ~ Frank Abagnale

The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on. ~ Ulysses S. Grant

No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. ~ Ulysses S. Grant

God gave us Lincoln and Liberty, let us fight for both. ~ Ulysses S. Grant

Labor disgraces no man; unfortunately you occasionally find men disgrace labor. ~ Ulysses S. Grant

Wars produce many stories of fiction, some of which are told until they are believed to be true. ~ Ulysses S. Grant

  • 3 and lean toward 4. Zarbon 17:54, 26 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 21:47, 26 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 04:27, 28 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 4. Great quote. Still very relevant today, especially in regards to those who try to distort history. – Illegitimate Barrister 20:07, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

A modest man is steady, an humble man timid, and a vain one presumptuous. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft

  • 2 Zarbon 17:54, 26 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 21:47, 26 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 04:27, 28 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.

It is the logic of our times,
No subject for immortal verse—
That we who lived by honest dreams
Defend the bad against the worse.
~ Cecil Day Lewis

Tempt me no more, for I
Have known the lightning's hour,
The poet's inward pride,
The certainty of power.
~ Cecil Day Lewis

The Church says that the Earth is flat, but I know that it is round. For I have seen the shadow of the earth on the moon and I have more faith in the Shadow than in the Church. ~ Ferdinand Magellan (date of death)

  • 3 if this is truly properly attributed to Magellan. Zarbon 17:54, 26 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 0 The available evidence indicates this to probably be a misattribution, and thus unacceptable as a quote of Magellan. ~ Kalki 04:27, 28 April 2009 (UTC) + tweaks

Those who cavalierly reject the Theory of Evolution, as not adequately supported by facts, seem quite to forget that their own theory is supported by no facts at all. Like the majority of men who are born to a given belief, they demand the most rigorous proof of any adverse belief, but assume that their own needs none. ~ Herbert Spencer (dob)

Homophobia is like racism and anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry in that it seeks to dehumanize a large group of people, to deny their humanity, their dignity and person hood. ~ Coretta Scott King (GoodReads quotes) (dob)

Wherefore my counsel is that we hold fast ever to the heavenly way and follow after justice and virtue always, considering that the soul is immortal and able to endure every sort of good and every sort of evil. Thus shall we live dear to one another and to the gods.
~ Plato ~
  • 3 Kalki·· 22:40, 21 October 2014 (UTC) with a strong lean toward 4 — NO birthdate for Plato, but the year was 427 … and thus placing suggestions for him here at 4/27.

I don't know why black skin may not cover a true heart as well as a white one.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

The whole Democratic press, and the morbidly honest and 'reformatory' portion of the Republican press, thought it horrible to keep U.S. troops stationed in the southern states, and when they were called upon to protect the lives of Negroes, as much citizens under the Constitution as if their skins were white, the country was scarcely large enough to hold the sound of indignation belched forth.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~
  • 3. A bit political, but interesting look into the man. – Illegitimate Barrister 20:07, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

The Negro votes the Republican ticket because he knows his friends are of that party. Many a good citizen votes the opposite, not because he agrees with the great principles of state which separate parties, but because, generally, he is opposed to Negro rule. This is a most delusive cry. Treat the negro as a citizen and a voter, as he is and must remain, and soon parties will be divided, not on the color line, but on principle.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~
  • 3. A bit political, but interesting look into the man. – Illegitimate Barrister 20:07, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

I have given the subject of arming the Negro my hearty support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heavyest blow yet given the Confederacy. The South rave a greatdeel about it and profess to be very angry.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

By arming the Negro we have added a powerful ally. They will make good soldiers and taking them from the enemy weaken him in the same proportion they strengthen us.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

The present difficulty, in bringing all parts of the United States to a happy unity and love of country grows out of the prejudice to color. The prejudice is a senseless one, but it exists.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

I felt like anything rather than rejoicing at the downfall of a foe who had fought so long and valiantly, and had suffered so much for a cause, though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~
  • 3. Quote said by U.S. Grant about Robert E. Lee, saying he did not want to rejoice at the latter's misery as the latter had fought so hard for a cause, even though the cause, slavery, was a bad one. – Illegitimate Barrister 20:07, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

The great 'War of the Rebellion' against the United States will have to be attributed to slavery. For some years before the war began it was a trite saying among some politicians that 'A state half slave and half free cannot exist.' All must become slave or all free, or the state will go down. I took no part myself in any such view of the case at the time, but since the war is over, reviewing the whole question, I have come to the conclusion that the saying is quite true.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

I can not doubt that the continued maintenance of slavery in Cuba is among the strongest inducements to the continuance of this strife. A terrible wrong is the natural cause of a terrible evil.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

Slavery in Cuba is a principal cause of the lamentable condition of the island.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

As soon as slavery fired upon the flag it was felt, we all felt, even those who did not object to slaves, that slavery must be destroyed. We felt that it was a stain to the Union that men should be bought and sold like cattle.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

There had to be an end of slavery. Then we were fighting an enemy with whom we could not make a peace. We had to destroy him. No convention, no treaty was possible. Only destruction.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~

My confidence in General Grant was not entirely due to the brilliant military successes achieved by him, but there was a moral as well as military basis for my faith in him. He had shown his single-mindedness and superiority to popular prejudice by his prompt cooperation with President Lincoln in his policy of employing colored troops, and his order commanding his soldiers to treat such troops with due respect. In this way he proved himself to be not only a wise general, but a great man.
~ Frederick Douglass ~
  • 3. Quote said by Frederick Douglass about Ulysses S. Grant, who was born on April 27. – Illegitimate Barrister 21:55, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

Suffrage once given can never be taken away, and all that remains for us now is to make good that gift by protecting those who have received it.
~ Ulysses S. Grant ~
  • 3. Quote said by Ulysses S. Grant, who was born on April 27. – Illegitimate Barrister 14:01, 5 August 2015 (UTC)