Complaints

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Complaints, in general usage, are expressions of displeasure.

Quotes[edit]

  • Nothing is feebler than the indolent rebellion of complaint...
  • Complaints … encourage those who hear our complaints to behave like those we complain about. Once divulged, the offenses done to us seem to make others pardonable. … It is better to praise the favors others have done for you, so as to win still more of them. When you tell how those absent have favored you, you are asking those present to do the same.
    • Baltasar Gracián, Oráculo Manual y Arte de Prudencia, § 129 (Christopher Maurer trans.)
  • Every one must see daily instances of people who complain from a mere habit of complaining.
  • There is an unfortunate disposition in a man to attend much more to the faults of his companions which offend him, than to their perfections which please him.
  • I have noticed this, that when a man is full of the Holy Ghost he is the very last man to be complaining of other people.
    • Dwight L. Moody, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 420.
  • When you see anyone complaining
    of such and such a person's ill-nature and bad temper,
    know that the complainant is bad-tempered,
    forasmuch as he speaks ill of that bad-tempered person,
    because he alone is good-tempered who is quietly forbearing
    towards the bad-tempered and ill-natured.
    • Rumi, Jewels of Remembrance : A Daybook of Spiritual Guidance : Containing 365 Selections from the Wisdom of Rumi (1996) Translated by Camille and Kabir Helminski, IV, 771-4
  • I pity the man who can travel from Dan to Beersheba and cry, 'Tis all barren!
    • Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy (1768) In the Street, Calais
  • Some people are never content with their lot, let what will happen. Clouds and darkness are over their heads, alike whether it rain or shine. To them every incident is an accident, and every accident a calamity.
    • Charles Spurgeon, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 420.
  • From mad dogs and grumbling professors may we all be delivered, and may we never take the complaint from either of them.
    • Charles Spurgeon, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 421.
  • Nothing is easier than fault-finding. No talent, no self-denial, no brains, no character, is required to set up in the grumbling business. But those that are moved by a genuine desire to do good have little time for murmuring or complaint.
    • Robert West, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 420.

External links[edit]

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