Diwali

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Over the centuries, Diwali has become a national festival that is enjoyed by most Indians regardless of faith: Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Sikhs.

Diwali (also Divali or Deepavali), known as the "festival of lights", is an ancient Hindu festival celebrated in autumn every year. The festival spiritually signifies the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil, and hope over despair. The festival preparations and rituals typically extend over a five day period, but the main festival night of Diwali coincides with the darkest, new moon night of the Hindu Lunisolar month Kartik. In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali night falls between mid-October and mid-November.

Quotes[edit]

The name [Divali] is derived from the Sanskrit term dipavali meaning “row of lights,” which are lit on the new-moon night to bid the presence of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth...
Diwali fireworks and lighting_celebrations

There Is Lots Of Websites Related To Diwali Images But As per My Knowledge I Saw  Happy Diwali Images

Indians celebrating Diwali in Little India in Singapore
  • Given the antiquity of India, the diversity of its religious traditions and the interaction among these, it should not surprise us to know that many religious communities celebrate Diwali. Each one offers a distinctive reason for the celebration that enriches its meaning. For every community, however, Diwali celebrates and affirms hope, and the triumph of goodness and justice over evil and injustice. These values define the meaning of Diwali.
    • Anantanand Rambachan in "Diwali does not end when the lights go out" at the Ministery of External Affairs, Government of India (30 October 2013)
  • Even in India customs can vary greatly. Celebrations in other countries can also be quite different. In some places it is a three-day festival, but it usually lasts for five days. Diwali includes the beginning of the new financial year.
    • Sue Penney in: Hinduism, Capstone Classroom, 1 July 2007, p. 28
Five Days of Diwali:On the first day of Diwali, housewives consider it auspicious to spring clean the home and shop for gold or kitchen utensils.
On the second day, people decorate their homes with clay lamps or diyas and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand.... - Reenita Malhotra Hora
  • Five Days of Diwali:On the first day of Diwali, housewives consider it auspicious to spring clean the home and shop for gold or kitchen utensils.
    On the second day, people decorate their homes with clay lamps or diyas and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand.
    This is the main day of the festival when families gather together for Lakshmi puja, a prayer to Goddess Lakshmi followed by mouth-watering feasts and firework festivities.
    This is the first day of the new year when friends and relatives visit with gifts and best wishes for the season.
    On the last day of Diwali, brothers visit their married sisters who welcome them with love and a lavish meal.
    • Reenita Malhotra Hora in: "Diwali, India's Festival of Light"
First Diwali day called Dhanteras or wealth worship. We perform Laskshmi-Puja in evening when clay diyas lighted to drive away shadows of evil spirits.In Diwali, goddess Lakshmi visits all people. Cows are worshipped for they are incarnations of Goddess Lakshmi.
Second day is called w:Naraka ChaturdashiNaraka Chaturdashi or Chhoti Diwali. Narakasur, after defeating Lord Indra, snatched the magnificent earrings of Mother Goddess Aditi and took sixteen thousand daughters of gods and saints to his harem. Lord Krishna killed the demon, brought all women and earrings of Aditi.... - Zak Vera
On the fourth day, Govardhan puja is performed. On this day Krishna saved Gokul by lifting up the Govardhan Mountain on his little finger and holding it over the people as an umbrella. - Longman
  • First Diwali day called Dhanteras or wealth worship. We perform Laskshmi-Puja in evening when clay diyas lighted to drive away shadows of evil spirits.In Diwali, goddess Lakshmi visits all people. Cows are worshipped for they are incarnations of Goddess Lakshmi.
  • Second day is called Naraka Chaturdashi or Chhoti Diwali. Narakasur, after defeating Lord Indra, snatched the magnificent earrings of Mother Goddess Aditi and took sixteen thousand daughters of gods and saints to his harem. Lord Krishna killed the demon, brought all women and earrings of Aditi. Lord Krishna came home early in the morning with demon blood on his forehead. Women massaged scented oil on Krishna and washed away dirt from his body. So we take oil massage and bathe before sunrise this day.
    • Zak Vera in: "Invisible River", p. 180
  • The third day Lakshmi Puja of the festival is the most important day of Deepawali and is entirely devoted to the propitiation of Goddess Lakshmi. On this very day Sun enters its second course and passes Libra which is represented by the balance or scale; Hence this design of Libra is believed to have suggested the balancing of account books and their closing. Despite the fact that this day falls on an Amavasya (the night of New Moon) day it is regarded as the most auspicious.
    • Pramodkumar in: "Meri Khoj Ek Bharat Ki", p. 108
  • It is extremely important to keep the house spotlessly clean and pure on Diwali. Goddess Lakshmi likes cleanliness, and she will visit the cleanest house first. Lamps are lit in the evening to welcome the goddess. They are believed to light up her path.
    • Pramodkumar in: "Meri Khoj Ek Bharat Ki", p. 109
  • The fifth day is celebrated as Bhai dooj. On this day, sisters apply tika on their brother’s foreheads and pray for their well-being and long life.
    • Longman in: "Images", p. 79
Decoration of a temple in Nepal
  • Throughout the festival, Hindus decorate their homes, temples and other buildings with rows of lights. In the past small clay lamps called Divas (or diwas) were used. ‘Diwali’ is a short form of “Deepavali”, which means “rows of lights”. Today, small electric lights are often used instead of lamps. Glitter and tinsel are also used for decorations.
    • Sue Penney in: "Hinduism", P.28
  • Diwali last for five fun-filled days and nights. Each day honors a Hindu legend. These legends each teach an important lesson.
    • Kate Torpie in: Diwali, Crabtree Publishing Company, 30 September 2008, p. 10
  • Playing cards is very popular during Diwali. According to a Hindu legend, people who do not play card games during Diwali will be born as donkeys in their next lives.
    • Kate Torpie in: P.22
  • Aryans made the Dravidians to celebrate the Deepavali festival, Rama’s birthday, Krishna’s birthday. Similarly the Northerners made the Dravidians celebrate August 15th as the Independence Day. That is all. There is no other benefit or laudable reason.
...This assumption is reinforced by their worship along with Ganesha, especially during Diwali. But no myths support this notion. The deities are worshiped together simply because they represent similar goals. - Royina Grewal
  • Ganesha is frequently depicted with Saraswati, the Goddess of learning and music, and Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth and prosperity. Since Ganesha is associated with similar attributes as the goddesses, many devotees believe that they are his wives in previous incarnations. This assumption is reinforced by their worship along with Ganesha, especially during Diwali. But no myths support this notion. The deities are worshiped together simply because they represent similar goals.
  • Like Christmas in the West, Diwali is very much a time for buying and exchanging gifts. Traditionally sweets and dried fruit were very common gifts to exchange, but the festival has become a time for serious shopping, leading to anxiety that commercialism is eroding the spiritual side of the festival. In most years shopkeepers expect sales to rise substantially in the weeks before the festival.
  • Diwali is also a traditional time to redecorate homes and buy new clothes. Diwali is also used to celebrate a successful harvest.
    • BBC in: "Diwali"

In Jainism[edit]

  • Religious group of the Jains, celebrate Diwali in a strictly religious way. They even fast, or stop eating, for three days! They offer their sufferings to their Gods.
    • Kate Torpie in: P.20

In Sikhism[edit]

For Sikhs, Diwali is particularly important because it celebrates the release from prison of the sixth guru, Guru Hargobind, and 52 other princes with him, in 1619. - BBC.
  • For Sikhs, Diwali is particularly important because it celebrates the release from prison of the sixth guru, Guru Hargobind, and 52 other princes with him, in 1619.
  • The Sikh tradition holds that the Emperor Jahangir had imprisoned Guru Hargobind and 52 princes. The Emperor was asked to release Guru Hargobind which he agreed to do. However, Guru Hargobind asked that the princes be released also. The Emperor agreed, but said only those who could hold onto his cloak tail would be allowed to leave the prison. This was in order to limit the number of prisoners who could leave. However, Guru Hargobind had a cloak made with 52 pieces of string and so each prince was able to hold onto one string and leave prison. Sikhs celebrated the return of Guru Hargobind by lighting the [[w:Harmandir Sahib|Golden Temple and this tradition continues today.
    • BBC in: "Diwali"

External links[edit]

  • Encyclopedic article on Diwali at Wikipedia
  • Media related to Diwali at Wikimedia Commons