Ivan Konev

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Our neighbors use searchlights, for they want more light. I tell you, Nikolai Pavlovich, we need more darkness.

Ivan Stepanovich Konev (28 December [O.S. 16 December] 189721 May 1973) was a Soviet military commander, who led Red Army forces on the Eastern Front during World War II, liberated much of Eastern Europe from occupation by the Axis Powers, and helped in the capture of Germany's capital, Berlin. Later, as the Commander of Warsaw Pact forces, Konev led the suppression of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 by Soviet armed divisions. Konev remained one of the Soviet Union's most admired military figures until his death in 1973. Marshal of the Soviet Union, and Twice Hero of the Soviet Union, he was buried in the Kremlin Wall with the greatest heroes of the USSR, which can be visited today.

Quotes[edit]

  • As for me, I had to know exactly what the situation was in Dukla Pass. Moscow had demanded it.
    • Quoted in "The Last Six Months: Russia's Final Battles with Hitler's Armies in World War II" - Page 312 - by Sergeĭ Matveevich Shtemenko - History - 1977.
  • We plan alone but we fulfill our plans together with the enemy, as it were, in accordance with his opposition.
    • Quoted in "How Wars End: Eye-witness Accounts of the Fall of Berlin" - by Vladimir Sevruk - History - 1974 - Page 27.
  • I do not want to give any orders to the airmen, but get hold of a Komsomol air unit, and say I want volunteers for the job.
    • Quoted in "Russia at War, 1941-1945" - Page 779 - by Alexander Werth - 1964.
  • Our neighbors use searchlights, for they want more light. I tell you, Nikolai Pavlovich, we need more darkness.
    • Quoted in "The Last Battle" - Page 354 - by Cornelius Ryan - History - 1966.

Quotes about Konev[edit]

  • Our difficulties with the Russians increased, but I never really blamed Konev. He obviously was merely carrying out instructions. He even had a sense of humor about it occasionally. Once when we were discussing Austrian politics, the name of the Communist party leader, Ernst Fischer, was mentioned. Jokingly, I said: "Well, I don't like him because he is a Communist." Konev grunted. "That's fine," he said. "I don't like him either because he's an Austrian Communist."
  • On another occasion, I decided to give Konev, who liked to hunt, a custom-built rifle, with a silver plate on the stock inscribed "To Marshal Konev, from his friend, General Clark." I wasn't sure he would get it if I simply delivered it to his headquarters, so I had an officer take it to him. I didn't even get an acknowledgement from Konev, although I saw him on several official occasions. Finally, about three weeks after I had sent the gun, I walked to lunch with him after the commissioners' meeting. Speaking through an interpreter, I asked if he had received the gun. "Yes". "Ask the marshal whether he liked it." "Yes". "I just wondered," I said. "I hadn't received any acknowledgement." "Well, you didn't send any ammunition."
Once I said to Konev, "You've made ten demands at this Council meeting that we can't meet. But suppose I should say, 'All right. We agree to all ten demands.' Then what would you do?" "Tomorrow," he said, "I'd have ten new ones."
  • Once I said to Konev, "You've made ten demands at this Council meeting that we can't meet. But suppose I should say, 'All right. We agree to all ten demands.' Then what would you do?" "Tomorrow," he said, "I'd have ten new ones."
    • Mark W. Clark, in his book From the Danube to the Yalu (1954), p. 493

External links[edit]

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