West Virginia

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Country roads, take me home to the place I belong.
West Virginia, mountain mama.
Take me home, country roads. ~ John Denver
Montani Semper Liberi- Mountaineers Are Always Free.
Ask anyone who's been there about West Virginia. ~ Lynn Seldon
Abraham Lincoln's statue in Charleston, WV
Back Allegheny Mountain near Cass, WV
The number of West Virginia lovers is growing quickly as word spreads about what the state has to offer. Visitors are drawn to incredible natural beauty, a wealth of outdoor recreation opportunities, many historical attractions, an excellent state park system, friendly people, and a simpler and slower-paced way of life. ~ Lynn Seldon
Main Street- Cass, WV
Blackwater Falls in Tucker County, WV
West Virginia Turnpike in June 1974

West Virginia, officially the State of West Virginia, is a U.S. state located in the Appalachian region in the Southern United States and is also considered to be a part of the Middle Atlantic states. It is bordered by Pennsylvania to the north, Maryland to the east and northeast, Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, and Ohio to the northwest. West Virginia is the 41st largest state by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston.

Montani semper liberi  (motto)

Quotes[edit]

  • Montani Semper Liberi
    • State motto of West Virginia, "Mountaineers Are Always Free"
  • Ask anyone who's been there about West Virginia. It just takes one visit to fall in love with this wild and wonderful state. I fell in love with West Virginia on my first visit and I've been back more than a hundred times. If I don't end up moving there, I'll get back there as often as possible. My father's side of the family has West Virginia roots and I can feel it in my blood every time I cross the state border from my home in Virginia. The West Virginia mountains and the proud people get in your blood and it's a very warm feeling. The number of West Virginia lovers is growing quickly as word spreads about what the state has to offer. Visitors are drawn to incredible natural beauty, a wealth of outdoor recreation opportunities, many historical attractions, an excellent state park system, friendly people, and a simpler and slower-paced way of life.
    • Lynn Seldon, Country Roads of West Virginia: Drives, Day Trips, and Weekend Excursions (1998), p. vii
  • Coal may have once been king in the Mountaineer State, but tourists are now treated like royalty in West Virginia. Tourism is the second largest industry (behind chemicals) and the fastest-growing segment, as new and old visitors explore the state. Convenient interstate routes in West Virginia make access easier than many driver assume. The exploration possibilities are extensive, but all are within a one-day drive of half the population in the United States. The state's beauty is definitely worth the drive. From friendly cities to rugged mountains, West Virginia is a welcome change. Each region offers its own outdoor and indoor pleasures, but the entire state definitely deserves the nickname, "Almost Heaven."
    • Lynn Seldon, Country Roads of West Virginia: Drives, Day Trips, and Weekend Excursions (1998), p. vii
  • Coal- called by ancient Greeks "the rock that burns"- powered the modernization of America. Rich coal-bearing regions like southern West Virginia were transformed in the late nineteenth century into teeming industrial civilizations. The completion of the Chesapeake & Ohio in 1873 and the Norfolk & Western in 1883 opened up the southern West Virginia coalfields. Soon, thousands of coal miners and their families crowded into the rugged river valleys where independent coal operators boldly opened mining ventures. West Virginia's sturdy coal miners came from all over the world. Black Americans from the Deep South joined Eastern European immigrants seeking a better life and poured into the sprawling coal camps which housed the workers. More than 100,000 miners toiled underground in the industry's glory years, laboriously hand loading the "black diamonds" that transformed the United States from a rural nation into an international industrial power. Five billion tons of the world's finest industrial fuel flowed out along the smoothly grated roadbeds of the N&W and the C&O, hauled by the most powerful steam locomotives ever designed.
    • Lynn Seldon, Country Roads of West Virginia: Drives, Day Trips, and Weekend Excursions (1998), p. 59
  • Although coal mining was dark, dirty, and dangerous work, many miners enjoyed the unique chore. Some old-timers still reminisce about the close sense of community which united the inhabitants of more than 500 small company towns that were once situated along the Coal Heritage Trail. The road winds past company stores, miners' houses, massive railroad yards, and company towns. Visitors can experience the coal society and heritage that still exists and gain remarkable insight into a unique part of American history.
    • Lynn Seldon, Country Roads of West Virginia: Drives, Day Trips, and Weekend Excursions (1998), p. 59

External links[edit]