Build Back Better Plan

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The Build Back Better framework is proposed federal legislation in the United States. It consists of two parts:

The cost of the first is pegged at $1.2 trillion dollars, while the cost of the second is projected to be between $1.5 and $2.1 trillion dollars. The total cost of this framwork is expected to be between $2.7 and $3.3 trillion dollars, costs that president Biden committed will be paid by increased taxation and not by increased debt. If fully enacted, it would include investments in infrastructure, and is projected to create 10 million clean-energy jobs. Expenditures would also include government funds on housing, education, economic fairness and health care.

Quotes about Build Back Better Plan[edit]

Democrats need to run on results, and this should light a fire under frontline Democrats to get Build Back Better passed ~ Tom Perriello
  • We have our Build Back Better Framework. Now it’s time for Congress to pass it. Let’s get this done.
  • As we’ve consistently said, there are dozens of our members who want to vote both bills — the Build Back Better Act and the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act — out of the House together
  • A full accounting of the spending and revenue has been provided by the White House, numerous pieces of the legislation have already been scored, and the [Joint Committee on Taxation] has put out analysis that Build Back Better will contribute to reducing the deficit
  • However, if our six colleagues still want to wait for a CBO score, we would agree to give them that time — after which point we can vote on both bills together.
  • On the night the Build Back Better vote was to take place, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy forced a delay until the following morning by delivering an 8 hour, 32-minute floor speech—the longest in House history—during which he assailed the legislation as “big government socialism.” And, as with most legislation passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, not a single Republican supported the bill, which also lost the support a lone Democrat who voted against it. Now it’s the Senate’s turn. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer hopes to pass the bill by Christmas, but he first has to convince all 50 Democrats and the two independents who caucus with them to back the plan. It won’t be easy. The paid family leave provision may be cut to satisfy a demand from Sen. Joe Manchin, and Sen. Bernie Sanders will call for provisions in such areas as Medicare and climate to be strengthened. Any changes to the legislation will have to be voted on in the House, where Pelosi holds a razor-thin majority and can only afford three defections from her party. * In the meantime, Democrats have some selling to do. Many of the bill’s provisions won’t go into effect until after the 2022 mid-term election cycle where Democrats will go head to head for control of both houses. They will need to convince the American public of the many ways their lives will be made easier and more affordable by the Build Back Better Act.
  • President Biden's framework is the product of months of negotiations and input from all members of the Democratic Party who share a common goal to deliver for the American people.
  • As we work through the text of the legislation I would hope all of us will continue to deal in good faith and do what is right for the future of the American people
  • The Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill represents a historic investment in West Virginia’s infrastructure – around $6 billion over the next 5 years. Here are some of the investments that the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill will bring to WV:
  • Thanks to the #AmericanRescuePlan, nearly $124 MILLION in relief is on the way to 440 #WV healthcare providers. I fought for dedicated funding for rural healthcare providers in the ARP to ensure they can continue to provide critical care in our communities
The legislation marks the largest investment in passenger rail since the creation of Amtrak 50 years ago, with $66 billion earmarked for high-speed rail, safety improvements, Amtrak grants and modernization of the rail route connecting Washington, D.C., to Boston. ~Jonathan Ponciano/Forbes
$7.5 billion for the nation’s first network of electric-vehicle chargers along highway corridors... ~Jonathan Ponciano/Forbes
  • President Joe Biden on Monday signed into law one of the largest infrastructure packages in U.S. history... shoring up $1.2 trillion, $550 billion in new investments for the nation's bridges, airports, waterways, public transit and more... Headlining the 2,702-page bill’s spending,
  • roughly $110 billion... toward improving the nation's roads and bridges...
  • the largest-ever federal investment in public transit, allotting $39 billion to modernize systems, improve access for the elderly and people with disabilities, and repair more than 24,000 buses, 5,000 railcars and thousands of miles of train tracks....
  • $66 billion earmarked for high-speed rail, safety improvements...
  • $65 billion to bolster the country's broadband infrastructure ...
  • $108 billion..help upgrade the nation’s electricity grid...
  • $7.5 billion for the nation’s first network of electric-vehicle chargers along highway corridors...
  • $5 billion for zero-emission buses...
  • $2.5 billion for ferries. Clean drinking water...
  • $55 billion to replace all the nation's lead pipes and service lines...
  • more than $50 billion for water infrastructure improvement... a sweeping clean-up measure targeting toxic hot spots or areas of heavy industrial pollution...
  • More than $25 billion...to help modernize America's airports...
  • $11 billion in transportation safety programs, including a new program to help... reduce crashes and fatalities... particularly among cyclists and pedestrians...
  • In addition to the $550 billion in new investments, the package also includes roughly:
  • $650 billion in previously authorized funding for roads and other infrastructure,
  • including nearly $300 billion for the Highway Trust Fund and
  • $90 billion for public transit...
  • Sanders' remarks on the NDAA—which cleared a key procedural hurdle late Wednesday—came as Democrats in Congress also worked to finalize the Build Back Better Act, a reconciliation package whose social spending and climate provisions have been gutted to satisfy right-wing members of the majority party such as Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.). Manchin, a key swing vote in the Senate, has repeatedly cited the national debt as a reason to pare back the reconciliation bill, which now has a top-line price tag of around $1.75 trillion over ten years—roughly half of the original $3.5 trillion framework. But while the West Virginia Democrat says he's alarmed by the prospect of spending to expand Medicare and combat the climate crisis, he appears unconcerned that, over the past decade, Congress has poured over $9 trillion into the only federal agency that has yet to pass a full independent audit. Manchin has approved every NDAA since 2011, and he voted Wednesday to advance the 2022 Pentagon budget.
  • After months of productive, good-faith negotiations with @POTUS and the White House, we have made significant progress on the proposed budget reconciliation package. I look forward to getting this done, expanding economic opportunities and helping everyday families get ahead.

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External links[edit]

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