France

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England is an empire. Germany, a country. France is a person. ~ Jules Michelet
In France, the characteristic attitude of newcomers from North Africa, Turkey, and sub-Saharan Africa is predominantly one of alienation, confrontation, rejection, and hatred. ~ Jean-Francois Revel

France, officially the French Republic (French: République française), is a unitary semi-presidential republic in Western Europe. Metropolitan France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered (clockwise starting from the northeast) by Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Monaco; with Spain and Andorra to the south. France is linked to the United Kingdom by the Channel Tunnel, which passes underneath the English Channel. Over the past 500 years, France has been a major power with strong cultural, economic, military and political influence in Europe and in the world. During the 17th and 18th centuries, France colonised great parts of North America and South Asia; and built the second largest empire of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Quotes[edit]

  • In France, the characteristic attitude of newcomers from North Africa, Turkey, and sub-Saharan Africa is predominantly one of alienation, confrontation, rejection, and hatred.
  • France, famed in all great arts, in none supreme.
    • Matthew Arnold, The Strayed Reveller, and Other Poems, "To a Republican Friend" (c. March 1848).
  • The creation of Modern France through expansion goes back to the establishment of a small kingdom in the area around Paris in the late tenth century and was not completed until the incorporation of Nice and Savoy in 1860. The existing "hexagon" was the result of a long series of wars and conquests involving the triumph of French language and culture over what once were autonomous and culturally distinctive communities. The assimilation of Gascons, Savoyards, Occitans, Basques, and others helped to sustain the myth that French overseas expansionism in the nineteenth century, especially to North and West Africa, was a continuation of the same assmilationist project.
  • England is an empire; Germany, a country — a race; France is a person.
    • Jules Michelet, History of France: from the earliest period to the present time (1845), Volume 1, D. Appleton & Co., 1845, p.182.
  • And threat'ning France, plac'd like a painted Jove,
    Kept idle thunder in his lifted hand.
  • I have never liked France or the French, and I have never stopped saying so.
    • Adolf Hitler, The Political Testament of Adolf Hitler (15th February 1945).
  • Toute ma vie, je me suis fait une certaine idée de la France.
    • Translated: "All my life I have had a certain idea of France".
    • Charles de Gaulle, opening sentence of his Mémoires de guerre.
  • La France a perdu une bataille, mais la France n'a pas perdu la guerre.
    • Translated: "France has lost a battle, but France has not lost the war".
    • Charles de Gaulle, Proclamation, June 18 1940.
  • I hate the French because they are all slaves and wear wooden shoes.
    • Oliver Goldsmith, Essays (Ed. 1765), 24. Appeared in the British Magazine, June, 1760. Also in Essay on the History of a Disabled Soldier. Dove—English Classics.
  • Gay, sprightly, land of mirth and social ease
    Pleased with thyself, whom all the world can please.
  • [Mi manca] il calore delle persone [italiane]: c'è una grande facilità nella comunicazione, mentre i francesi non sono così estroversi. D'altra parte, in Francia c'è una grande vivacità nel mondo del cinema: si producono almeno duecento film all'anno e le occasioni di lavoro sono moltissime. Purtroppo non c'è paragone col cinema italiano
  • [I miss] the warmth of the [Italian] people: it is very easy to communicate with them, while the French are not such extroverts. On the other hand, there is a vibrant film industry in France: at least two hundred films are produced there, and the job opportunities are many. Unfortunately, the Italian film industry does not compare.
  • How old I am! I'm eighty years!
    I've worked both hard and long,
    Yet patient as my life has been,
    One dearest sight I have not seen—
    It almost seems a wrong;
    A dream I had when life was new,
    Alas our dreams! they come not true;
    I thought to see fair Carcassonne,
    That lovely city—Carcassonne!
    • Gustave Nadaud, Carcassonne; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 89.
  • "They order," said I, "this matter better in France."

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 293-294.
  • La France est une monarchie absolue, tempérée par des chansons.
    • France is an absolute monarchy, tempered by ballads.
    • Quoted by Chamfort.
  • The Frenchman, easy, debonair, and brisk,
    Give him his lass, his fiddle, and his frisk,
    Is always happy, reign whoever may,
    And laughs the sense of mis'ry far away.
  • Adieu, plaisant pays de France!
    O, ma patrie
    La plus cherie,
    Qui a nourrie ma jeune enfance!
    Adieu, France—adieu, mes beaux jours.
    • Adieu, delightful land of France! O my country so dear, which nourished my infancy! Adieu France—adieu my beautiful days!
    • Lines attributed to Mary, Queen of Scots, but a forgery of De Querlon.
  • Yet, who can help loving the land that has taught us
    Six hundred and eighty-five ways to dress eggs?
  • Have the French for friends, but not for neighbors.
    • Emperor Nicephorus (803) while treating with ambassadors of Charlemagne.
  • On connoit en France 685 manières differentes d'accommoder les œufs.
    • One knows in France 685 different ways of preparing eggs.
    • De la Reynière.
  • Ye sons of France, awake to glory!
    Hark! Hark! what myriads bid you rise!
    Your children, wives, and grandsires hoary,
    Behold their tears and hear their cries!
  • Une natione de singes à larynx de parroquets.

Unsourced[edit]

  • France is the only country where the money falls apart and you can't tear the toilet paper.
  • Everyone has two countries, his or her own--and France.

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