Alberta

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search
I've been thinking that Alberta ought to be it's own nation for many many years. Well over a decade, and the main reason for that is simply because of the concept that the people should have as much sovereign democratic control over the law of government as possible. ~ Jeff Rout
Alberta has a vote, but that vote is practically meaningless and, as a result of that, is that truly democracy? No, it's not democracy. People in Alberta don't have any direct democratic control over the laws of government. That's not right. ~ Jeff Rout

Alberta is one of Canada's prairie provinces. It became a province on September 1, 1905. Alberta is located in Western Canada, bounded by the provinces of British Columbia to the west and Saskatchewan to the east, Northwest Territories to the north, and by the U.S. state of Montana to the south. Alberta is one of two provinces (the other being New Brunswick) to border only a single U.S. state. It is also one of two provinces that are land-locked (the other being Saskatchewan).

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZSee alsoExternal links

Quotes[edit]

B[edit]

  • [N]o one outside this in-group of "real Albertans" should get any say in daily life here. Alberta belongs to the True Albertan (presumably, a white dude riding a horse around a farm or a giant truck around the oil sands) and everybody else—Eastern Bastards, First Nations, immigrants, leftists, and Muslims—can get fucked. What can we say? Here in God's Country, the right leans white.
  • Albertans are deeply emotionally attached to Canada—even the ones convinced that Justin Trudeau is a secret Muslim with a boner for Sharia Law and climate change is a hoax fabricated by the UN as an excuse to throw Christians in the gulag.

C[edit]

  • Come to me. I want to plow you like a Calgary driveway at Christmas.

G[edit]

Jeannie: I can't believe I am betting my life on your sense of direction!
Dr. McKay: What are you talking about?! I've got an excellent sense of direction!
Jeannie: Oh, really? Remember when we went to West Edmonton Mall and Dad had to call the police to find you?
Dr. McKay: That mall was huge!
Jeannie: There were maps every seven metres!
Dr. McKay: Misleading ones!

H[edit]

  • It is imperative to take the initiative, to build firewalls around Alberta, to limit the extent to which an aggressive and hostile federal government can encroach upon legitimate provincial jurisdiction.
    • Stephen Harper, as quoted in the National Post, January 24, 2001, “Open Letter to Ralph Klein”

R[edit]

  • I've been thinking that Alberta ought to be it's own nation for many many years. Well over a decade, and the main reason for that is simply because of the concept that the people should have as much sovereign democratic control over the law of government as possible. Alberta has a vote, but that vote is practically meaningless and, as a result of that, is that truly democracy? No, it's not democracy. People in Alberta don't have any direct democratic control over the laws of government. That's not right.

S[edit]

  • Part of the learning curve in Edmonton is learning to hate Calgary.

Z[edit]

  • Independence doesn't solve anything, the only way that this turns out well for Alberta economically, in the long run, is union with the United States, and that's a very different political decision than simply secession.
  • Canada’s demographic situation is similar to the rest of the developed world — a large population moving toward retirement and hardly any young people in the replacement generation coming up. However, Alberta does not fit that mould. It is the youngest province, and is becoming younger, better paid and more highly skilled as the rest of Canada becomes older and less skilled, and a ward of the state financially.
  • Alberta as an independent country doesn’t solve a huge number of problems. If it left Canada, its currency goes through the roof because all it has is oil exports, and that would drive agriculture out of business. It would be a one-horse economy in a very short time. Seceding to the U.S. becomes the only political and economic option. If you do that, the inflation issue goes away, the tax problem goes away, the security problem goes away. Alberta gets everything it says it wants out of Canada within the first year of joining the U.S. Seceding to the U.S. becomes the only political and economic option.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Encyclopedic article on Alberta at Wikipedia
  • The dictionary definition of alberta at Wiktionary
  • Alberta travel guide from Wikivoyage