Meritocracy

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

Meritocracy is a political system in which power is vested in individuals according to merit.

Quotes[edit]

  • The wise man must not be ordered but must order, and he must not obey another, but the less wise must obey him.
    • Aristotle, Metaphysics 982a17, Complete Works, vol. 2, p. 1554
  • Everyone know how compromised the idea of bureaucracy as a meritocratic system is. The first criterion of loyalty to any organization is therefore complicity. Career advancement is not based on merit but on a willingness to play along with the fiction that career advancement is based on merit, or with the fiction that rules and regulations apply to everyone equally, when in fact they are often deployed as an instrument of arbitrary personal power. ... As whole societies have come to represent themselves as giant credentialized meritocracies, rather than as systems of predatory extraction, we bustle about, trying to curry favor by pretending we actually believe it to be true.
  • When the rate of return on capital exceeds the rate of growth of output and income, as it did in the nineteenth century and seems quite likely to do again in the twenty-first, capitalism automatically generates arbitrary and unsustainable inequalities that radically undermine the meritocratic values on which democratic societies are based.
  • That, precisely, is the deadliness of second-handers. They have no concern for facts, ideas, work. They’re concerned only with people. They don’t ask: ‘Is this true?’ They ask: ‘Is this what others think is true?’ Not to judge, but to repeat. Not to do, but to give the impression of doing. Not creation, but show. Not ability, but friendship. Not merit, but pull.
    • Ayn Rand, Dominique Francon in The Fountainhead (1968), p. 727

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: