Vegetarianism

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Vegetarianism is a practice that consists of a diet that excludes meat (including game and slaughter by-products), fish (including shellfish and other sea animals) and poultry. The reasons for choosing vegetarianism may be related to morality, religion, culture, ethics, aesthetics, environment, society, economy, politics, taste, or health.

Humor[edit]

  • "I am a vegetarian for health reasons - the health of the chicken."
  • "Some say if animals are not used for food they will overrun the earth. In India the Hindus do not kill cows, but they are not overrun by them."
    • An eminent Hindu quoted by Ralph Waldo Trine (1866-1958) in Every Living Creature, p. 32
  • "[The animals] are now especially bred for eating purposes, and if the demand decreased, the supply would decrease also. Further, how is it that we are not overrun by wild animals of all sorts? […] People need not worry about the future welfare of the bovine race, if they would only be a little more humane in their treatment of its present representatives!"
    • Hereward Carrington, The Natural Food for Man, p. 159-160
  • "If eating meat why not eat the most highly organised form of meat, which is not beef or mutton, but human flesh? If you still believe in the eating of flesh, then you must admit that at least as far as the fitness of food is concerned the cannibal has the best of the argument."
  • "The Animals, you say, were “sent” For man’s free use and nutriment. Pray, then, inform me, and be candid, Why came they aeons before man did, To spend long centuries on earth Awaiting their Devourer’s birth? Those ill-timed chattels, sent from Heaven, Were, sure, the maddest gift e’er given – “Sent” for man’s use (can man believe it?) When there was no man to receive it!"
  • "Vegans and vegetarians are commonly baited by nonvegetarians with “what if” scenarios that typically have no relevance to or bearing on most people’s real-life situations."
    • Joanne Stepaniak, M.S. Ed., Being Vegan
  • "I was told that my diet was so poor that I could not repair the bones that were broken and operated on. So I have just had an Xradiograph taken; and lo! perfectly mended solid bone so beautifully white that I have left instructions that, if I die, a glove stretcher is to be made of me and sent to you as a souvenir."
  • "The average age of a meat-eater is 63. I am on the verge of 85 and still at work as hard as ever. I have lived quite long enough and am trying to die; but I simply cannot do it. A single beef-steak; would finish me; but I cannot bring myself to swallow it. I am oppressed with a dread of living forever. That is the only disadvantage of vegetarianism"
  • "My will contains directions for my funeral which will be followed not by mourning coaches but by oxen, sheep, flocks of poultry, and a small travelling aquarium of live fish, all wearing scarves in honour of the man who perished rather than eat his fellow-creatures. It will be, with the exception of Noah's Ark, the most remarkable thing of the kind ever seen."
  • "First, how do you prove that mankind is invested with the right of killing them, and that brutes have been created for the purpose you assert them to be? Secondly, it is to be observed that the flesh of man himself possesses the same nourishing and palatable qualities? Are we then to become cannibals for that reason? "
    • Lewis Gompertz (1779-1861), Moral Inquiries
  • "O impudence of power and might,/ Thus to condemn a hawk or kite,/When thou, perhaps, carniv'rous sinner,/Hadst pullets yesterday for dinner!'."
    • John Gay, The Fables, Volume 1 (1727), Pythagoras and the Countryman
  • "A pitiful fellow! Such a ridiculous kind of pity his, as those silly souls have, who would not kill an innocent chicken for the world; but when killed to their hands, are always the most greedy devourers of it."
  • "When I see bacon, I see a pig, I see a little friend, and that’s why I can’t eat it. Simple as that. But I’ll eat Linda’s veggie bacon. All her food was so good. Steve Martin came around for a barbecue once. I was grilling and he said, “Oh, no, I can’t have any of that.” I asked why not and he said, “Sorry, I’m vegetarian.” I said, “You didn’t know we are?! Everything on the grill is veggie!” He said, “Ahhh” and ate three veggie burgers and then asked where he could buy them. "
  • "So then Mom decided my father ought to do a vegan diet, too. Well, my father grew up on a cattle ranch, but the nice thing is, my dad’s been sitting at the same dinner table for fifty-one years, and he can’t find his way around the kitchen! He’s been relying my Mom for fifty-one years to put the plate in front of him. So Mom went to the local health food store and bought hot dogs that are called “Not Dogs” and veggie burgers – which used to taste like cardboard, but now they’re really good. She can get Canadian bacon made of a wheat derivative. It’s all vegetarian. Instead of cow’s milk, it’s soy milk, rice milk, fake eggs – all that stuff! Dad just keeps cleaning his plate. Now I’ve got two vegetarian parents, and only one of them know it!"
  • " For all we know that English people are/ Fed upon beef - I won't say much of beer/ Because 'tis liquor only, /and being far/ From this my subject, has no business here; / We know too, they are very fond of war,/ A pleasure - like all pleasures - rather dear;/ So were the Cretans - from which I infer/ That beef and battle both were owing her."
  • "Opposers of compassion urge: 'If we should live on vegetable food, what shall we do with our cattle? What would become of them? They would grow so numerous they would be prejudicial to us - they would eat us up if we did not kill and eat them!' But there is abundance of animals in the world whom men do not kill and eat; and yet we hear not of their injuring mankind, and sufficient room is found for their abode. Horses are not usually killed to be eaten, and yet we have not heard of any country overstocked with them. [...] Because some [animals] have no compassion, feeling, or reason, are we to possess no compassion, feeling, or reason?"
    • George Nicholson (1760 - 1825), Remarks on defenses of flesh-eating
  • "And yet (would you believe it?) I have seen the very men who have thus boasted of their tenderness, at the same time devouring the flesh of six different animals tossed up in a fricassee. Strange contrariety of conduct! They pity, and they eat the objects of their compassion!"
  • "I believe I have omitted mentioning that, in my first voyage from Boston, being becalm'd off Block Island, our people set about catching cod, and hauled up a great many. Hitherto I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and on this occasion consider'd, with my [vegetarian] master Tryon, the taking every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them had, or ever could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter. All this seemed very reasonable. But I had formerly been a great lover of fish, and, when this came hot out of the frying-pan, it smelt admirably well. I balanc'd some time between principle and inclination, till I recollected that, when the fish were opened, I saw smaller fish taken out of their stomachs; then thought I, "If you eat one another, I don't see why we mayn't eat you." So I din'd upon cod very heartily, and continued to eat with other people, returning only now and then occasionally to a vegetable diet. So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable creature, since it enables one to find or make a reason for everything one has a mind to do."
  • "Quite rightly, we do not normally take the behaviour of animals as a model for how we may treat them. We would not, for example, justify tearing a cat to pieces because we had observed the cat tearing a mouse to pieces. Carnivorous fishes don’t have a choice about whether to kill other fish or not. They kill as a matter of instinct. Meanwhile, humans can choose to abstain from killing or eating fish and other animals. Alternatively, the argument could be made that is part of natural order that there are predators and prey, and so it cannot be wrong for us to play our part in this order. But this “argument from nature” can justify all kinds of inequities, including the rule of men over women and leaving the weak and the sick to fall by the wayside. "
    • Peter Singer, The Ethics of What We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter
  • "Perhaps a man hitched to the cart of a Martian or roasted on the spit by inhabitants of the Milky Way will recall the veal cutlet he used to slice on his dinner plate and apologize (belatedly) to the cow."
  • "A dead cow or sheep lying in a pasture is recognized as carrion. The same sort of carcass dressed and hung up in a butchers stall passes as food."

Health[edit]

  • "My best performances were when I was 30 years old, and I was a vegan."
    • Carl Lewis, retired American track and field olympic athlete [1]
  • "Showing meat eaters that you can get bigger and stronger on a vegan diet is the best thing about being a vegan strength coach." – Mike Mahler, in www.veganbodybuilding.com
  • "I’m 44 years old. My oldest son is 20 years old. Most people who don’t know us think I’m his girlfriend or sister rather than his mom. How’s that for motivation!" – Lisa Koehn , in www.veganbodybuilding.com
  • "We were all brainwashed to believe that the only source of protein was meat and cheese." - Suzanne Havala, RD, charter fellow of the American Dietetic Association, quoted by Pamela Rice in 101 Reasons why I’m a Vegetarian, p. 137.
  • "They say that vegetable food is not sufficiently nutritious. But chemistry proves the contrary. So does physiology. So does experience. […] And again: the largest and strongest animals in the world are those which eat no flesh-food of any kind-the elephant and the rhinoceros." - Dr. Russel Trall, Scientific Basis of Vegetarianism, p. 20
  • "Why do we have a milk group? Because we have a National Diary Council. Why do we have a meat group? Because we have an extremely powerful meat lobby.." – Marion Nestle, Director of Public Health Initiatives for the Steinhardt School of Education, quoted by Pamela Rice in 101 Reasons why I’m a Vegetarian, 2005, p.74.
  • "In fact, my best year of track competition was the first year I ate a vegan diet. Moreover, by continuing to eat a vegan diet, my weight is under control, I like the way I look. (...)I regained my energy. I was drinking 24 to 32 ounces of juice a day. I ate no dairy products. And I had my best year as an athlete ever! (...) I know that many people think that eating a vegetarian diet - and especially a vegan diet – will require sacrifice and denial. Jannequin Bennett demonstrates in this book that eating vegan does not have to be tasteless and boring." – Carl Lewis, Excerpt from Carl Lewis’ introduction to Very Vegetarian, by Jannequin Bennett
  • "The cow doesn't grow fast enough for man / So through his greed he makes a faster plan / He has drugs to make the cow grow quicker / Through the stress the cow gets sicker / Twenty-one different drugs are pumped / Into the cow in one big lump / So just before it dies, it cries / In the slaughterhouse full of germs and flies / Off with the head, they pack it, drain it, and cart it / And there it is, in your local supermarket / Red and bloody, a corpse, neatly packed / And you wonder about heart attacks? " - KRS-One, Boogie Down Productions, 1990, Edutainment, Beef
  • "[Vegetarianism] will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications." – The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition[specific citation needed]
  • "My endurance has gone up, and I haven’t gotten tired at all during the whole season. I don’t think you should eat something that had a mother." - Salim Stoudmire, Animal Times, Spring, 2008, p. 17
  • "The most extraordinary workers I ever saw, the labourers in the mines of Chili, Live exclusively on vegetable food, including manny seeds of leguminous plants." – Charles Darwin, quoted by C.W. Leadbeater in Vegetarianism and Occultism, 1913, p. 20
  • "People sometimes forget that there are vegetables and vegetables. There are vegetables that have not so much nutriment in them; but there are others – all the farinaceous foods such as wheat and barley – which contain a greater amount of nutriment than beef or any other animal meat." – Professor Francis William Newman (1805-1897), President of the Vegetarian Society, quoted in the International Vegetarian Union website[specific citation needed]
  • "After looking carefully into the matter, and after some years’ experience in its non-use, I can state without hesitancy that, contrary to the prevailing opinion, the flesh of animals is not necessary as an article of food. […] We shall find numerous articles of food, as we study the matter, that, so far as body nourishing, building, and sustaining qualities are concerned, contain twice, and in some cases over twice, as much as any flesh food that can be mentioned." - Ralph Waldo Trine (1866-1958), Every Living Creature, p. 25-26
  • "It is interesting to note that scientific men all over the world are awakened to the fact that the flesh of animals as food is not a pure nutriment, but is mixed with poisonous substances, excrementitious in character, which are the natural results of animal life."– Dr.John Harvey Kellogg, quoted by C.W. Leadbeater in Vegetarianism and Occultism, 1913, p. 14
  • "The superiority of the diet I recommend is established beyond the possibility of debate." – Dr. William A. Alcott, The Vegetable Diet: As Sanctioned by Medical Men and by Experience in All Ages
  • " [O]ne of the objections frequently brought against vegetarianism is that it is a beautiful theory, but on the working of which is impracticable, since it is supposed that a man cannot live without devoring dead flesh. That objection is irrational, and is founded upon ignorance or preversion of facts. I am myself an example of its falsity; for I have lived without the pollution of flesh food-without meat, fish or fowl-for the last thirty-eight years, and I not only still survive, but have been during all the time in remarkably good health. Nor am I in any way peculiar in this, for I know some thousands of others who have done the same thing. ." – C.W. Leadbeater, Vegetarianism and Occultism, 1913, p. 3
  • "Man lives very well upon flesh, you say, but, if he thinks this food to be natural to him, why does he not use it as it is, as furnished to him by Nature? But, in fact, be shrinks in horror from seizing and rending living or even raw flesh with his teeth, and lights a fire to change its natural and proper condition . . . What is clearer than that man is not furnished for hunting, much less for eating, other animals? In one word, we seem to be admirably admonished by Cicero that man was destined for other things than for seizing and cutting the throats of other animals. If you answer, "that may be said to be an industry ordered by Nature, by which such weapons are invented," then, behold, it is by the very same artificial instrument that men make weapons for mutual slaughter. Do they this at the instigation of Nature? Can a use so noxious be called natural? Faculty is given by Nature, but it is our own fault that we make a perverse use of it." – Pierre Gassendi, Letter to Van Helmont
  • "The peoples living upon vegetable foods, are, of all men, the handsomest, the most vigorous, the least exposed to diseases and to passions, and they whose lives last longest" – Bernardin de Saint-Pierre , Etudes
  • "Give up animal foods for two months, or even for a week, and I promise you will look and feel better, and you’ll want to do it forever! " - Alicia Silverstone, Animal Times, Spring, 2008, p 3
  • "Comparative anatomy, therefore, proves that man is naturally a frugivorous animal, formed to subsist upon fruits, seeds, and farinaceous vegetables." – Sylvester Graham, The Science of Human Life
  • "Strange spectacle! To see a mother giving her daughter, whom but yesterday she was suckling at her breast, this gross aliment of bloody meats, and the dangerous excitant wine!" - Jules Michelet, La Femme, vi. Onzième Edition, Paris, 1879
  • "I am experiencing an unprecedented surge of health and my energy has soared." – Ilya Repin, in Vegetarianskoe obozrenie (after he became a vegetarian)
  • "Vegetarianism is necessary to the very rich and the very poor. The poor need it because it is cheap and nourishing, the rich to cleanse all the poisons from the corpses that have accumulated in their overfed organism." – Natalia Borissowna Nordman, Povarennaia kneiga dlia golodaiushchikh
  • "For the last month I have been a strict vegetarian. The moral effects of this regime are immense, owing to the voluntary subjugation of the flesh and the resulting absence of desires. You will appreciate how full I am of this idea when I tell you that I expect it to work the regeneration of mankind. I advise you to change over to a natural way of life, with proper nourishment (wholemeal bread), and you will soon feel the benefit." – Gustav Mahler, on a 1880 letter[specific citation needed]
  • "I drink soy milk, and that’s the right thing. " - Howard Stern, Animal Times, Spring, 2008, p. 17
  • "Don´t live to eat, eat to live" – Antoni Gaudi, (Gaudi was a vegetarian), Juan Bergós Massó, Gaudí, el hombre y la obra, Barcelona : Universidad Politécnica, 1974
  • "The table was well spread with all manner of fruit, beans, greenstuff and good pies...but of flesh and fish there was never a sign." – Shmuel Yosef Agnon, The Bridal Canopy
  • "Since I stopped eating meat, I have noticed that my digestion is better, my thoughts are better, and I run instead of walking. […] I eat vegetables and all kinds of vegetarian food. I am a vegetarian. I am not a meat-eater." - Vaslav Nijinsky , The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky
  • "O wretched and unhappy Italy! Can you not see that gluttony murders every year more of your inhabitants than you could lose by the most cruel plague or by fire and sword in many battles?" - Luigi Cornaro, Discorsi della Vita Sobria
  • "It is the position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. " - American Dietetic Association, (from their website www.eatright.org)[specific citation needed]
  • "The meat industry spends hundreds of millions of dollars lying to the public about their product. But no amount of false propaganda can sanitize meat. The facts are absolutely clear: Eating meat is bad for human health, catastrophic for the environment, and a living nightmare for animals" – Chrissie Hynde from The Pretenders, in the PETA website[specific citation needed]
  • "It is my view that the vegetarian manner of living by its purely physical effect on the human temperament would most beneficially influence the lot of mankind." - Albert Einstein, letter to Vegetarian Watch-Tower, December 27, 1930
  • "True and constant vigor of the body is the effect of health, which is much better preserved with watery, herbaceous, frugal, and tender food, than with vinous, abundant, hard, and gross flesh. […] the vulgar opinion, then which, on health reasons condemns vegetable food and so much praises animal food, being so ill-founded, I have always thought it well to oppose myself to it, moved both by experience and by that refined knowledge of natural things which some study and conversation with great men have given me." - Antonio Cocchi, The Pythagorean Diet
  • " All wholesome food is caught without a net or a trap. " – William Blake, on The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
  • "It is certainly preferable to raise vegetables, and I think, therefore, that vegetarianism is a commendable departure from the established barbarous habit. That we can subsist on plant food and perform our work even to advantage is not a theory, but a well-demonstrated fact. Many races living almost exclusively on vegetables are of superior physique and strength. There is no doubt that some plant food, such as oatmeal, is more economical than meat, and superior to it in regard to both mechanical and mental performance. Such food, moreover, taxes our digestive organs decidedly less, and, in making us more contented and sociable, produces an amount of good difficult to estimate. In view of these facts every effort should be made to stop the wanton and cruel slaughter of animals, which must be destructive to our morals. " - Nikola Tesla (Century Illustrated Magazine, June 1900)
  • "It is not my purpose here to discuss the question of vegetarianism, or to meet the objections that may be urged against it; though it must be admitted that of these objections not one can withstand a loyal and scrupulous inquiry. I, for my part, can affirm that those whom I have known to submit themselves to this regimen have found its result to be improved or restored health, marked addition of strength, and the acquisition by the mind of a clearness, brightness, well-being, such as might follow the release from some secular, loathsome, detestable dungeon." - Maurice Maeterlinck, on The Buried Temple (le Temple Enseveli), III - The kingdoom of Matter, 5
  • "Until the age of twelve, then, I only lived on bread, milk-food, vegetables, and fruit. My health was not less robust on this account, nor my growth less rapid, and it was to this diet, perhaps, that I was indebted for that purity of feature, that exquisite sensibility of feeling, and that quiet gentleness of humor and character which I had preserved up to that period." - Alphonse de Lamartine, On Les confidences
  • " Like my friend the Doctor, I have lived temperately, eating little animal food, and that not as an ailment, so much as a condiment for the vegetables, which constitute my principle diet" - Thomas Jefferson, letter written on March 21, 1819 to Dr. Vine Utley [specific citation needed]
  • "When John Coltrane came to me, he looked different from his contemporaries: so clean, well-mannered and humble. About six months earlier he had apparently given up drugs and drink, become a vegetarian and taken to reading Ramakrishna's book's." - Ravi Shankar, Raga Mala
  • "I do not eat meat, I do not smoke, and I do not drink, and therefore, I do not feel the cold. " - Percy Grainger , J. Bird, Percy Grainger, 1998, p. 253

Anatomical and Physiological[edit]

  • "Though nature has given sensibility to pain to such living organisms as have the power of movement, in order thereby to preserve the members which in this movement are liable to diminish and be destroyed, the living organisms which have no power of movement do not have to encounter opposing objects, and plants consequently do not need to have a sensibility to pain, and so it comes about that if you break them they do not feel anguish in their members as do the animals." – Leonardo da Vinci, Leonardo da Vinci's Note-Books, Arranged and rendered into English by Edward McCurdy, 1923, p. 130
  • "Today it is generally accepted that although the earliest humans probably ate some meat, it was unlikely to have played a major role in their diet. Plants would have been a much more important source of food." – Dr. Jane Goodall, Harvest for Hope
  • "Based on the fossil record one big spurt in hominid cranial capacity seems to have occurred with the appearance of Homo erectus approximately 1.75 million years ago, long before red meat could have been a regular part of hominid diets." – Donna Hart and Robert W. Sussman, Man the Hunted, expanded edition, p. 256
  • "Further, it should be clear that meat in itself as protein is not much superior to eggs or nuts and could not alter the evolution of the brain; if this were so this miracle food would have continued to enlarge humans’ brain size in succeeding years when much greater amounts of meat were consumed " – Colin Spencer, The Heretic's Feast
  • "None, so far as I know, will affirm or at least with any show of reason maintain, that anatomy, so far as that goes, is in favour of flesh eating " – Dr. William A. Alcott, The Vegetable Diet: As Sanctioned by Medical Men and by Experience in All Ages
  • "Were one to stop and think of what meat is, and what it was, it is doubtful if one could eat it. It is merely dead and decaying flesh - flesh from the body of an animal. […] Only by the fact that hey are covered up, and their true nature concealed by cooking, and basting, and pickling, and peppering and salting can we eat them at all. If we were natural carnivorous animals, we should delight in bloodshed and gore of all kind! […] We should eat our flesh warm and quivering - just as it comes from the cow!" - Hereward Carrington, The Natural Food for Man, p. 160-161
  • "He who has ever turned with abhorrence from the skeleton of a beast which has been picked whole by birds or vermin, must confess that habit alone could have enabled him to endure the sight of the mangled bones and flesh of a dead carcase which every day cover his table." - John Hawkesworth, in his edition of Swift’s Works
  • "This species of food [fruits and farinacea] is that which is most suited to man..." – Carl Linnaeus, Amaenitates academica, x., 8
  • "The natural food of man, to judge from his structure, appears to consit principally of the fruits, roots, and other succulent parts of vegetables." – Georges Cuvier, Le Régne Animal
  • "It is, i think, not going to far to say that every fact connected with the human organization goes to prove that man was originally formed a frugivorous animal. This opinion is principally derived from the formation of his teeth and of his digestive organs, as well as from the character of his skin, and the general structure of his limbs." – Thomas Bell, Anatomy, physiology, and Diseases of the teeth
  • "It is only by softening and disguising, dead flesh by culinary preparation, that it is rendered susceptible of mastication or digestion; and that the sight of its bloody juices and raw horror, does not excite intolerable loathing and disgust. Let the advocate of animal food, force himself to a decisive experiment on its fitness, and as Plutarch recommends, tear a living lamb with his teeth, and plunging his head into its vitals, slake his thirst with the steaming blood; when fresh from the deed ofhorror let him revert to the irresistible instincts of nature that would rise in judgment against it, and say, Nature formed me for such work as this. Then, and then only, would he be consistent." - Percy Bysshe Shelley , A Vindication of Natural Diet, 1813
  • "The Tiger, the Lion, in short, all flesh-eating animals seized their prey, running, swimming, or flying, and tore it in pieces with their teeth or talons, devouring it there and then upon the spot. Man cannot catch other animals this way, or tear them in pieces, and devour them as they are… Besides he has higher and not merely animal impulses." - Gustav von Struve, Mandaras’ Wanderungen
  • "How would our society women like to spend the morning in a slaughterhouse, before they could procure their meat for evening dinner?" - Hereward Carrington, Natural Food of Man, p. 161
  • "It is a specious but false reason to allege that, since man has acquired this taste, he ought to be permitted to indulge it – in the first place because Nature has not given him cooked flesh, and because several ages must have rolled away before fire was used. […] Nature, then, could have given man only raw or living flesh, and we know that it is repugnant to him over the whole extent of the earth." – Jean Antoine Gleizes, Thalysie, 1840
  • "Humankind does not show the mixed structural features one expects and finds in anatomical omnivores such as bears and raccoons. Thus, from comparing the gastrointestinal tract of humans to that of carnivores, herbivores and omnivores we must conclude that humankind's GI tract is designed for a purely plant-food diet." - Milton R. Mills, M.D., The Comparative Anatomy of Eating
  • "Most eminent physiologists declare that fruit is the natural food for man, and… we have the example of Buddha, Pythagoras, Plato, Porphyry, Ray, Daniel, Wesley, Howard, Shelley, Sir Isaac Pitman, Edison, Sir W. B. Richardson, and a host of other eminent men as vegetarians." – Mohandas Gandhi, Religious Vegetarianism from Hesiod to the Dalai Lama[specific citation needed]
  • "How many times, for instance, have we not heard people speak with all the assurance of conviction about canine teeth and “simple stomach” of man as certain evidence of his natural adaptation for a flesh diet! At least we have demonstrated one fact – that if such arguments are valid, they apply with even greater force to the anthropoid apes, whose “canine teeth" are much longer and more powerful then those of man. [...] and yet, with the solitary exception of man, there is not one of these last that does not, in a natural condition, absolutely refuse to feed on flesh! M. pouchet observes that all the details of the digestive apparatus in man, as well as his dentition, constitute so many proofs of his frugivorous origin; an opinion shared by Owen, who remarks that the anthropoids and all quadrumana drive all their alimentation from fruits, grains, and other succulent and nutritive vegetable substances; and that the strict analogy which exists between the structure of the animals and that of man clearly demonstrates his frugivorous nature. This is, also, the view taken by Gassendi, Cuvier, Linné, Professor Lawrence, Charles Bell, Flourens, and a great number of other eminent writers." – Anna Kingsford, M.D. , The Perfect way of Diet
  • "Although most of us conduct our lives as omnivores, in that we eat flesh as well as vegetables and fruits, human beings have characteristics of herbivores, not carnivores . The appendages of carnivores are claws; those of herbivores are hands or hooves. The teeth of carnivores are sharp; those of herbivores are mainly flat (for grinding). The intestinal tract of carnivores is short (3 times body length); that of herbivores, long (12 times body length). Body cooling of carnivores is done by panting; herbivores, by sweating. Carnivores drink fluids by lapping; herbivores, by sipping. Carnivores produce their own vitamin C, whereas herbivores obtain it from their diet. Thus, humans have characteristics of herbivores, not carnivores." - William C. Roberts, M.D.,, Twenty questions on atherosclerosis

Ethical[edit]

  • "We marvel that there should have been men, that there still should be men who slay human beings in order to eat their flesh. The time will come when our grandchildren will marvel that their grandfathers had been in the habit of killing millions of animals every day in order to eat them, although they could satisfy their hunger both wholesomely and pleasantly with the fruits of the earth and without killing."
    • Leo Tolstoy, The Pathway of Life: Teaching Love and Wisdom (posthumous), Part I, International Book Publishing Company, New York, 1919, p. 68.
  • "HEN: What appalling villains! I feel faint. Oh no! they'll tear my eyes out, and cut my throat! I'll be roasted and eaten! Won't these ruffians suffer any remorse ?
    COCK: No, my dear. The two priests I told you about were saying that men don't ever have any remorse for things that they're accustomed to doing."
    • Voltaire, Dialogue between the Cock and the Hen
  • "If we each had to butcher our own meat, there would be a great increase in the number of vegetarians."
  • "The butcher with his bloody apron incites bloodshed, murder. Why not? From cutting the throat of a young calf to cutting the throat of our brothers and sisters is but a step. While we are ourselves the living graves of murdered animals, how can we expect any ideal conditions on the earth?"
  • "Go to the meat-market of a Saturday night and see the crowds of live bipeds staring up at the long rows of dead quadrupeds. Does not that sight take a tooth out of the cannibal’s jaw? Cannibals? who is not a cannibal? I tell you it will be more tolerable for the Fejee that salted down a lean missionary in his cellar against a coming famine; it will be more tolerable for that provident Fejee, I say, in the day of judgment than for thee, civilized and enlightened gourmand, who nailest geese to the ground and feasted on their bloated livers in thy pate-de-foie-gras."
  • "There is not a single argument nor a single fact that can be offered in favour of flesh eating that cannot be offered, with equal strength, in favour of cannibalism."
  • "People of the future will say, “meat-eaters!” in disgust and regard us in the same way that we regard cannibals and cannibalism."
    • Dennis Weaver, quoted by Gail Davis in Vegetarian Food for Thought
  • "The too obvious fact that a large portion of animals are carnivorous neither proves nor justifies the carnivorousness of the human species."
    • Howard Williams (1837-1931), The Ethics of Diet
  • "The time will come in the world’s history, and a movement is setting in that direction even now, when it will be deemed as strange a thing to find a man or a woman who eats flesh as food, as it is now to find a man or woman who refrains from eating it."
    • Ralph Waldo Trine (1866-1958), Every Living Creature, p. 34
  • "Just as, in our days, exposure of children, combats of gladiators, torture of prisioners, and other atrocities are held to be scandalous and shameful, while in earlier times they were thought quite justifiable and right, so in the future will be the murder of animals, to feed upon their corpses, be pronounced to be immoral and indefensible."
    • Wilhelm Zimmermann(1819-1885), The Way to Paradise
  • "As human sacrifices were a natural effect of that superstitious cruelty which first produced the slaughter of animals, so is it equally natural that those accustomed to eat the brute, should not long abstain from the man : more especially as; when toasted or broiled on the altar, the appearance, savour, and taste of both would be nearly, if not entirely, the same."
  • "The man who shed the blood of an Ox or a Sheep will be habituated more easily than another to witness the effusion of that of his fellow-creatures."
  • "Would the delicate ladies who devour sanguinary beef-steaks like to see their sons working as slaughtermen? If not, then they have no right to put this task upon some other woman’s son."
  • "Yes; the stain rests upon the flesh-eaters, not upon the flesh providers!"
    • Hereward Carrington, The Natural Food for Man, p. 162
  • "As I cannot kill, I cannot authorize others to kill. Do you see? If you are buying from a butcher you are authorizing him to kill – to kill helpless, dumb creatures which neither you nor I could kill ourselves."
  • "I presume that very few men and very few women would be willing to go and catch hold either sheep or of oxen and themselves slaughter the creatures in order that they may eat. […] Now, I venture to submit that if people want to eat meat, they should kill the animals for themselves, that they have no right to degrade other people by work of that sort. Nor should they say that if they did not do it the slaughter would still go on. […] Every person who eats meat takes a share in that degradation of his fellow-men; on him and on her personally lies the share, and personally lies the responsibility".
    • Annie Besant, Vegetarianism in the Light of Theosophy, 1913, P. 18-20
  • "Thousands of people who say they 'love' animals sit down once or twice a day to enjoy the flesh of creatures who have been utterly deprived of everything that could make their lives worth living and who endured the awful suffering and the terror of the abattoirs."
  • "It is strange to hear people talk on humanitarianism, who are members of societies for prevention of cruelty to children and animals, and who claim to be God-loving men and women, but who, nevertheless, encourage by their patronage the killing of animals merely to gratify the cravings of appetite."
  • "Even if man were created a carnivorous animal, is there no way for him to outgrow it as he becomes more intelligent?"
  • " The destruction of animals for food, in its details and tendencies, involves so much cruelty as to cause every reflecting individual – not destitude of the ordinary sensibilities of nature – to shudder."
  • "Cruelty stares at me from the butcher’s face. I tread amidst carcasses. I am in the presence of the slain. The death-set eyes of beasts peer at me and accuse me of belonging to the race of murderers. "
  • "Only by discarding a diet based on rotting corpses could men become sane. ."
  • "The butcher with his bloody apron incites bloodshed, murder. Why not? From cutting the throat of a young calf to cutting the throat of our brothers and sisters is but a step. While we are ourselves the living graves of murdered animals, how can we expect any ideal conditions on the earth? " – Isadora Duncan, My Life
  • "Thousands-millions and billions-of animals are killed for food. That is very sad. We human beings can live without meat, especially in our modern world. We have a great variety of vegetables and other supplementary foods, so we have the capacity and the responsibility to save billions of lives. I have seen many individuals and groups promoting animal rights and following a vegetarian diet. This is excellent."
  • "It is frightful wrong that other species are tortured, worried, flayed, and devored by us, in spite of the fact that we are not obliged to this by necessity; while in sinning against the defenceless and helpless, just claimants as they are upon our reasonable conscience and upon our compassion, we succeed only in brutalising ourselves."
  • "I was in a sushi bar and it dawned on me – how could I discriminate between a cow and a fish?"
  • "There is no logical basis to support the theory that plants feel pain. The dubious possibility that they might, however, is no justification for killing obviously sentient beings. Any rational person understands the striking difference between slitting the throat of a sentient animal and plucking a fruit or a vegetable."
    • Joanne Stepaniak, M.S. Ed., Being Vegan
  • "Simply let those, like him of Samos, live!
    Let herbs to them a bloodless banquet give.
    In beechen goblets let their beverage shine,
    Cool from the crystal spring their sober wine!
    Their youth should pass in innocence secure
    From stain licentious, and in manners pure."
  • "Nothing can be more shocking and horrid than one of our kitchens sprinkled with blood, and abounding with the cries of expiring victims or with the limbs of dead animals scattered or hung up here and there."
  • "We manage to swallow flesh, only because we do not think of the cruel and sinful thing we do."
  • "To any thinking person, it must be obvious that there is something badly wrong in relations between human beings and the animals that human beings rely on for food; and that in the past 100 or 150 years whatever is wrong has become wrong on a huge scale, as traditional animal husbandry has been turned into an industry using industrial methods of production. [...] It would be a mistake to idealise traditional animal husbandry as the standard by which the animal-products industry falls short: traditional animal husbandry is brutal enough, just on a smaller scale. A better standard by which to judge both practices would be the simple standard of humanity: is this truly the best that human beings are capable of? "
    • J.M. Coetzee, Animals can't speak for themselves - it's up to us to do it, February 22, 2007
  • "[Isaac Newton] thought it a very frightful inconsistency to believe that animals feel and at the same time to cause them to suffer. On this point his morality was in accord with is philosophy. […] This compassion, which he felt for no other animals, culminated in true charity for men. In truth, without humanity, a virtue which comprehends all virtues, the name of philosopher would be little deserved."
    • Voltaire, Elements de la Philosophie de Newton
  • "All my life, I have been sickened by everything connected with meat-, fish-, and poultry eating. As a child, I saw apparently nice, kind people wring the necks of fowls, and I thought it foul; and I wondered if I could ever exert any influence to help bring such unworthiness to an end."
  • "A man can live and be healthy without killing animals for food; therefore, if he eats meat, he participates in taking animal life merely for the sake of his appetite. And to act so is immoral."
  • "Man alone consumes and engulfs more flesh than all other animals put together. He is, then, the greatest destroyer, and he is so more by abuse than by necessity. Instead of enjoying with moderation the resources offered him, in place of dispensing them with equity, in place of repairing in proportion as he destroys, of renewing in proportion as he annihilates, the rich man makes all his boast and glory in consuming, all his splendour in destroying, in one day, at his table, more matenal than would be necessary for the support of several families. He abuses equally other animals and his own species, the rest of whom live in famine, languish in misery, and work only to satisfy the immoderate appetite and the still more insatiable vanity of this human being who, destroying others by want, destroys himself by excess.
  • "Men fed upon meat, and drinking strong drinks, have all an impoisoned and acrid blood which drives them mad in a hundred different ways. Their main insanity express in the fury of shed the blood of his brothers and to devastate fertile lands to rule over cemeteries."
    • Voltaire, On The Princess of Babylon, Chapter III
  • "The indifference of children towards meat is one proof that the taste for meat is unnatural; their preference is for vegetable foods, such as milk, pastry, fruit, etc. Beware of changing this natural taste and making children flesh-eaters, if not for their health's sake, for the sake of their character. For however one tries to explain the practice, it is certain that great meat-eaters are usually more cruel and ferocious than other men. This has been recognized at all times and in all places. The English are noted for their cruelty while the Gaures are the gentlest of men. All savages are cruel, and it is not their customs that tend in this direction; their cruelty is the result of their food. They go to war as to the chase, and treat men as they would treat bears. Indeed in England butchers are not allowed to give evidence in a court of law,no more can surgeons. Great criminals prepare themselves for murder by drinking blood. Homer makes his flesh-eating Cyclops a terrible man, while his Lotus-eaters are so delightful that those who went to trade with them forgot even their own country to dwell among them."
  • "I, for my part, wonder of what sort of feeling, mind or reason that man was possessed who was first to pollute his mouth with gore, and allow his lips to touch the flesh of a murdered being; who spread his table with the mangled forms of dead bodies, and claimed as daily food and dainty dishes what but now were beings endowed with movement, with perception and with voice. For the sake of some little mouthful of flesh we deprive a soul of the sun and light, and of that portion of life and time it had been born into the world to enjoy."
  • "(Of the mouth of man which is a tomb) there shall come forth loud noises out of the tombs of those who have died by an evil and violent death."
  • "Oh, come! That boot is on the other leg. Why should you call me to account for eating decently? If I battened on the scorched corpses of animals, you might well ask me why I did that."
  • "We cannot pretend that we do not know this. We are not ostriches, and cannot believe that if we refuse to look at what we do not wish to see, it will not exist. This is especially the case when what we do not wish to see is what we wish to eat. If it were really indispensable, or, if not indispensable, at least in some way useful! But it is quite unnecessary, and only serves to develop animal feelings, to excite desire, and to promote fornication and drunkenness. And this is continually being confirmed by the fact that young, kind, undepraved people—especially women and girls—without knowing how it logically follows, feel that virtue is incompatible with beefsteaks, and, as soon as they wish to be good, give up eating flesh."
  • " Simonson, in his rubber jacket and rubber overshoes fastened with a string over his worsted stockings (he was a vegetarian and would not wear the skin of slaughtered animals), was also in the courtyard waiting for the gang to start."
  • "How can one, who eats the flesh of others to swell his flesh, show compassion?"
  • "I have no doubt that it is a part of the destiny of the human race, in its gradual improvement, to leave off eating animals, as surely as the savage tribes have left off eating each other when they came in contact with the more civilized."
  • "As often as Herman had witnessed the slaughter of animals and fish, he always had the same thought: In their behavior toward creatures, all men were Nazis. The smugness with which man could do with other species as he pleased exemplified the most extreme racist theories, the principle that might is right."
  • "It is demonstrated that brutes are rational animals, reason in most of them being indeed imperfect, of which, nevertheless, they are not entirely deprived. Since, however, justice pertains to rational beings, as our opponents say, how is it possible not to admit, that we should also act justly towards brutes?"
    • Porphyry, On Abstinence from Animal Food
  • " Grant animals a ray of reason, imagine what a frightful nightmare the world is to them: a dream of cold-blooded men, blind and deaf, cutting their throats, slitting them open, gutting them, cutting them into pieces, cooking them alive, sometimes laughing at them and their contortions as they writhe in agony. Is there anything more atrocious among the cannibals of Africa? To a man whose mind is free there is something even more intolerable in the sufferings of animals than in the sufferings of men. For with the latter it is at least admitted that suffering is evil and that the man who causes it is a criminal. But thousands of animals are uselessly butchered every day without a shadow of remorse. If any man were to refer to it, he would be thought ridiculous.—And that is the unpardonable crime."
  • "Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace."
  • "I was raised on flesh, more flesh, still flesh, always flesh. When I started to use reason and organized my code of principles, I included vegetarianism in it; but it was too late to execute it."
  • " My mother was convinced, and on this head I have retained her firm belief, that to kill animals for the purpose of feeding on their flesh is one of the most deplorable and shameful infirmities of the human state; that it is one of those curses cast upon man either by his fall, or by the obduracy of his own perversity."
  • " Recently, while I was in the street, my eye was caught by a poulterer's shop; I stared unthinkingly at his piled-up wares, neatly and appetizingly laid out, when I became aware of a man at the side busily plucking a hen, while another man was just putting his hand in a cage, where he seized a live hen and tore its head off. The hideous scream of the animal, and the pitiful, weaker sounds of complaint that it made while being overpowered transfixed my soul with horror. Ever since then I have been unable to rid myself of this impression, although I had experienced it often before."
  • " And before we judge of them too harshly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races. The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space of fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit?."
  • " In all the round world of Utopia there is no meat. There used to be. But now we cannot stand the thought of slaughter-houses. And, in a population that is all educated, and at about the same level of physical refinement, it is practically impossible to find anyone who will hew a dead ox or pig. We never settled the hygienic question of meat-eating at all. This other aspect decided us. I can still remember, as a boy, the rejoicings over the closing of the last slaughter-house."
    • H.G. Wells, On A Modern Utopia Chapter the Ninth, The Samurai, Section 5
  • "Nothing more strongly arouses our disgust than cannibalism, nothing so surely unmortars a society; nothing, we might plausibly argue, will so harden and degrade the minds of those that practice it. And yet we ourselves make much the same appearance in the eyes of the Buddhist and the vegetarian. We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions, and organs with ourselves; we feed on babes, though not our own; and the slaughter-house resounds daily with screams of pain and fear. We distinguish, indeed; but the unwillingness of many nations to eat the dog, an animal with whom we live on terms of the next intimacy, shows how precariously the distinction is grounded."
  • "I refuse to eat animals because I cannot nourish myself by the sufferings and by the death of other creatures. I refuse to do so, because I suffered so painfully myself that I can feel the pains of others by recalling my own sufferings.I feel happy, nobody persecutes me; why should I persecute other beings or cause them to be persecuted? I feel happy, I am no prisoner, I am free; why should I cause other creatures to be made prisoners and thrown into jail? I feel happy, nobody harms me; why should I harm other creatures or have them harmed? I feel happy, nobody wounds me; nobody kills me; why should I wound or kill other creatures or cause them to be wounded or killed for my pleasure and convenience?(...) I think that men will be killed and tortured as long as animals are killed and tortured. So long there will be wars too. Because killing must be trained and perfected on smaller objects, morally and technically."
    • Edgar Kupfer-Koberwitz, Animals, My Brethren (written in the Concentration Camp Dachau, in the midst of all kinds of cruelties)
  • "As for me, I could never so much as endure, without remorse and griefe, to see a poore, sillie, and innocent beast pursued and killed, which is harmelesse and voide of defence, and of whom we receive no offence at all.
  • "It is not a digression to mention the horrors of war in connection with the massacre of cattle and carnivorous banquets. The diet of individuals corresponds closely to their manners. Blood demands blood. On this point anyone who searches among his recollections of the people whom he has known will find there can be no possible doubt as to the contrast which exists between vegetarians and coarse eaters of flesh, greedy drinkers of blood, in amenity of manner, gentleness of disposition and regularity of life."
  • "It is often said, as an excuse for the slaughter of animals, that it is better for them to live and to be butchered than not to live at all. Now, obviously, if such reasoning justifies the practice of flesh-eating, it must equally justify all breeding of animals for profit or pastime, when their life is a fairly happy one. (...) In fact, if we once admit that it is an advantage to an animal to be brought into the world, there is hardly any treatment that cannot be justified by the supposed terms of such a contract. Also, the argument must apply to mankind. It has, in fact, been the plea of the slave-breeder; and it is logically just as good an excuse for slave-holding as for flesh-eating. It would justify parents in almost any treatment of their children, who owe them, for the great boon of life, a debt of gratitude which no subsequent services can repay. We could hardly deny the same merit to cannibals, if they were to breed their human victims for the table, as the early Peruvians are said to have done."
  • " With respect to animal diet, let it be considered, that taking away the lives of animals, in order to convert them into food, does great violence to the principles of benevolence and compassion. This appears from the frequent hard-heartedness and cruelty found amongst those persons, whose occupations engage them in destroying animal life, as well as from the uneasiness which others feel in beholding the butchery of animals."
    • David Hartley, On Observations on Man, His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations
  • " I became a vegetarian because I was persuaded that life is as valid for other creatures as it is for humans. I do not need dead animal bodies to keep me alive, strong and healthy. Therefore, I will not kill for food."
  • " I have often thought, if it was not for this tyranny which custom usurps over us, that men of any tolerable good-nature could never be reconcil'd to the killing of so many animals for their daily food.
  • "No member of the animal kingdom nurses past maturity, No member of the animal kingdom ever did a thing to me, Its why I don't eat red meat or white fish, Don't give me no blue cheese, Were all members of the animal kingdom, Leave your brothers and sisters in the sea."
    • Prince, Animal Kingdom lyrics, from The Truth album
  • " Everything of persecution and revenge between man and man, and everything of cruelty to animals is a violation of moral duty."
  • "To see the convulsions, agonies and tortures of a poor fellow-creature, whom they cannot restore nor recompense, dying to gratify luxury and tickle callous and rank organs, must require a rocky heart, and a great degree of cruelty and ferocity. I cannot find any great difference between feeding on human flesh and feeding on [other] animal flesh, except custom and practice."
  • "Why is compassion not part of our established curriculum, an inherent part of our education? Compassion, awe, wonder, curiosity, exaltation, humility - these are the very foundation of any real civilization, no longer the prerogatives, the preserves of any one church,. but belonging to everyone, every child in every home, in every school."
  • "Now I can look at you in peace; I don`t eat you anymore."
    • Franz Kafka (quoted by Max Brod in Franz Kafka: A Biography)
  • "Many refined people will not kill a fly, but eat an ox."

Environmental[edit]

  • "The ever-increasing cattle production is wreaking havoc on the earth’s ecosystems, destroying habitats on six continents. Cattle raisin is a primary factor in the destruction of the word’s remaining tropical rain forests. […] Cattle are also a major cause of global warming… The devastating environmental, economic, and human toll of maintaining a worldwide cattle complex is little discussed in public policy circles… Yet, cattle production and beef consumption now rank among the gravest threats to the future well-being of the earth and its human population." - Jeremy Rifkin, Beyond Beef, 1992
  • "Those who claim to care about the well-being of human beings and the preservation of our environment should become vegetarians for that reason alone. They would thereby increase the amount of grain available to feed people elsewhere, reduce pollution, save water and energy, and cease contributing to the clearing of forests. When nonvegetarians say that "human problems come first" I cannot help wondering what exactly it is that they are doing for human beings that compels them to continue to support the wasteful, ruthless exploitation of farm animals." - Peter Singer, Animal Liberation
  • "We must recognize that it is ecological suicide for us to endeavour to maintain a meat based agriculture and a primary carnivorous diet." - Michael W. Fox, Inhumane Society, 1990
  • "The meat industry is one of the most destructive ecological industries on the planet. The raising and slaughtering of pigs, cows, sheep, turkeys and chickens not only utilizes vast areas of land and vast quantities of water, but it is a greater contributor to greenhouse gas emissions than the automobile industry." - Paul Watson, A Very Inconvenient Truth
  • "A kilogram of beef is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution than driving for 3 hours while leaving all the lights on back home.[...] In other words, a kilogram of beef is responsible for the equivalent of the amount of CO2 emitted by the average European car every 250 kilometres, and burns enough energy to light a 100-watt bulb for nearly 20 days." - New Scientist magazine, 18 July 2007, page 15
  • "The factory meat industry has polluted thousands of miles of America’s rivers, killed billions of fish, pushed tens of thousands of family farmers off their land, sickened and killed thousands of U.S. citizens, and treated millions of farm animals with unspeakable and unnecessary cruelty." - Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Waterkeeper Alliance
  • "According to a University of California study, it takes 5,214 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of beef. That’s more than a year of daily showers in exchange for 4 hamburgers. Even more fun, you can drive in your car for 3 hours and leave all the lights on in your house while doing it and you’re greenhouse gas emissions will not equal what comes from the production of just one kilogram of beef." - liveearth.org, Chicken or Beef? Or Vegetarian? Or Vegan?[specific citation needed]
  • "[I]t's untreated and unsanitary, bubbling with chemicals and diseased. … It goes onto the soil and into the water that many people will, ultimately, bathe in and wash their clothes with and drink. It is poisoning rivers and killing fish and making people sick. … Catastrophic cases of pollution, sickness, and death are occurring in areas where livestock operations are concentrated. … Every place where the animal factories have located, neighbors have complained of falling sick." - U.S. Staggers Under Weight of Waste From Farm Animals, 1998[specific citation needed]
  • "I have a very strong connection to nature, and I read that if we fish the way we fish, in 2048 there will be no more fish left, which is pretty soon." - Petra Němcová, Animal Times, Spring, 2008, p. 17
  • "Yet many Americans who have reluctantly given up their gas-guzzling cars would never think of questioning the resource costs of their grain-fed-meat diet. So let me try to give you some sense of the enormity of the resources flowing into livestock production in the United States. The consequences of a grain-fed-meat diet may be as severe as those of a nation of Cadillac drivers." – Frances Moore Lappé, Diet for a Small Planet
  • "For every 16 pounds of grain and soy fed to beef cattle in the United States we only get 1 pound back in meat on our plates. The other 15 pounds are inaccessible to us, either used by the animal to produce energy or to make some part of its own body that we do not eat (like hair or bones) or excreted." – Frances Moore Lappé, Diet for a Small Planet
  • "Some people seem to think that if the animals were not eaten they would multiply so rapidly as to overrun the earth. Is it not true that the more beef there is consumed the more there is raised? These people do not understand that there are men in the business who have made an effort to increase their stock by forced means." - Ha'nish Otoman Zar-Adusht Ha'nish, Mazdaznan Dietetics and Cookery Book, 1913, p. 197
  • "On both sides of the road, the forest has been cleared as far as the eye can see. For the most part, it has been cleared for cattle ranching. Today, there are over 8 million cattle in Brazilian Amazonia. Meat production is extremely inefficient (50 kg/hectare/year), making ranching an activity which is so wholly uneconomic that it would probably never have been undertaken on the present scale in the Brazilian Government, with aid from the World Bank and other multilateral development banks, had not poured $2 billion into subsidizing the cattle industry in Amazonia." - N. Hildyard, Adios Amazonia?
  • "To produce 1 lb. of feedlot beef requires 7 lbs. of feed grain, which takes 7,000 lbs. of water to grow. Pass up one hamburger, and you'll save as much water as you save by taking 40 showers with a low-flow nozzle. Yet in the U.S., 70% of all the wheat, corn and other grain produced goes to feeding herds of livestock. Around the world, as more water is diverted to raising pigs and chickens instead of producing crops for direct consumption, millions of wells are going dry. India, China, North Africa and the U.S. are all running freshwater deficits, pumping more from their aquifers than rain can replenish. As populations in water-scarce regions continue to expand, governments will inevitably act to cut these deficits by shifting water to grow food, not feed. The new policies will raise the price of meat to levels unaffordable for any but the rich. […]In the U.S., livestock now produce 130 times as much waste as people do. Just one hog farm in Utah, for example, produces more sewage than the city of Los Angeles. These megafarms are proliferating, and in populous areas their waste is tainting drinking water. In more pristine regions, from Indonesia to the Amazon, tropical rain forest is being burned down to make room for more and more cattle. Agriculture is the world's biggest cause of deforestation, and increasing demand for meat is the biggest force in the expansion of agriculture." - Ed Ayres, Time.com, Will We Still Eat Meat? [specific citation needed]
  • "Were the belief one day to become general that man could dispense with animal food, there would ensue not only a great economic revolution--for a bullock, to produce one pound of meat, consumes more than a hundred of provender--but a moral improvement as well, not less important and certainly more sincere and more lasting than might follow a second appearance on the earth of the Envoy of the Father, come to remedy the errors and omissions of his former pilgrimage." – Maurice Maeterlick, The Buried Temple, III The kingdom of Matter, 5
  • "The same quantity of ground has been proved to be capable of sustaining a larger and stronger population on a vegetable than on a meat diet." -Thomas Ignatius Maria Forster, Philozoia, 1839, p. 43
  • "I do not mean here absolute want of food, but want of healthful nutriment. How to provide good and plentiful food is, therefore, a most important question of the day. On the general principles the raising of cattle as a means of providing food is objectionable, because, in the sense interpreted above, it must undoubtedly tend to the addition of mass of a "smaller velocity." – Nikola Tesla, The Problem of Increasing Human Energy, Century Illustrated Magazine, June 1900
  • "Political economists tell us that the produce of an acre of land in wheat, corn, potatoes, and other vegetables, and in fruits, will sustain animal life sixteen times as long as when the produce of the same acre is converted into flesh, by feeding and fattening animals upon it." – William A. Alcott, Vegetable Diet, New York: Fowlers & Wells, 1848, pp. 263-265
  • "Pigs and cows and chicken and people are all competing for grain." - Margaret Mead
  • " When the soil is given up to the feeding of cattle, upon which man is to feed, the given area of land would supply far less nutriment, so to speak, than would the same soil, if grains were raised upon it… " - Hereward Carrington, The Natural Food for Man, p. 162

Religious[edit]

  • "Men think it right to eat animals, because they are led to believe that God sanctions it. This is untrue. No matter in what books it may be written that it is not sinful to slay animals and to eat them, it is more clearly written in the heart of man than in any books that animals are to be pitied and should not be slain any more than human beings. We all know this if we do not choke the voice of our conscience." – Leo Tolstoy, The Pathway of Life: Teaching Love and Wisdom (posthumous), Part I, International Book Publishing Company, New York, 1919, p. 68.
  • "There can be no purity whilst the flesh of creatures is partaken of and inhumanity toward animals is practiced." - Ruth Harrison, Animal Machines
  • "How will Man, that sanguinary Tyrant, be able to excuse himself from the charge of those innumerable cruelties inflicted on his unoffending subjects, committed to his care, and placed under his authority, by their common father?" - Soame Jenyns, On Cruelty to Animals
  • "Refrain at all times such foods as cannot be procured without violence and oppression. For know that all the inferior Creatures, when hurt, do cry and send forth their complaints to their Maker." - Thomas Tryon, The Way to Health, Long Life, and Happiness, 1683
  • "Jesus' message is about love and compassion, but there is nothing loving or compassionate at factory farms and slaughterhouses, where billions of animals endure miserable lives and die violent deaths. Jesus mandates kindness and mercy for all God's creatures. He'd be appalled by the suffering that we inflict on animals today to indulge our acquired taste for their flesh." - Bruce Friedrich, Is Eating Meat A Catholic Sin?
  • "Those who eat flesh are but eating grains and vegetables at second hand; for the animal receives from these things the nutrition that produces growth. The life that was in the grains and the vegetables passes into the eater. We receive it by eating the flesh of the animal. How much better to get it direct by eating the food that God provided for our use!" - Ellen White, Health and Happiness, 1905
  • "The only justification for killing animals is the fact that man can keep a knife or an axe in his hands and is shrewd enough and selfish enough to do slaughter for what he thinks is his own good. The Old Testament has many passages where the passion for meat is considered to be evil. According to the Bible, it was only a compromise with so-called human nature that God had allowed people to eat meat." - Isaac Bashevis Singer, from the foreword to Vegetarianism, a Way of Life
  • "I can never accept inconsistency or injustice. Even if it comes from God. If there would come a voice from God saying, "I'm against vegetarianism!" I would say, "Well, I am for it!" This is how strongly I feel in this regard." - Isaac Bashevis Singer, from the Preface to Food for the Spirit: Vegetarianism and the World Religions
  • "In the perfect world originally designed by God, man was meant to be a vegetarian." - Rabbi Jacob Cohen, The Royal Table
  • "The Human flesh and the flesh of beasts is similar and their crimson blood is also the same" – Kabīr, Religious Vegetarianism from Hesiod to the Dalai Lama[specific citation needed]
  • "Pythagoras, one of the oldest Philosophers in Europe, after he had travelled among the Easter nations for the sake of knowledge & conversation with their Priests & Judges seen their manners, taught his scholars that all man should be friends to all man & even to dumb beasts. This was the religion of the sons of Noah established by Moses & Christ & is still in force" – Sir Isaac Newton, Irenicum
  • "Human beings are meant to eat vegetarian food. The tiger does not come to eat your fruits. His prescribed food is animal flesh. But man’s food is vegetables, fruits, grains, and milk products. So how can you say that animal killing is not a sin?" – A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Religious Vegetarianism from Hesiod to the Dalai Lama
  • "There is in man a disposition to compassion as generally diffused as his other instincts. Newton had cultivated this sentiment of humanity, and he extended it to the lower animals. With Locke he was strongly convinced that God has given to them a proportion of ideas, and the same feelings, which he has to us . . . In truth, without humanity, a virtue which comprehends all virtues, the name of philosopher is little deserved." - Voltaire, Elémens de la Philosophie de Newton
  • "The mixing of meat and milk is a grave offense, an act that is pervaded altogether with the oppression of life, an oppression of a living being-and of property." – Abraham Isaac Kook, Religious Vegetarianism from Hesiod to the Dalai Lama[specific citation needed]
  • "Poor little innocent creatures, if you were reasoning beings and could speak, how you would curse us! For we are the cause of your death, and what have you done to deserve it?" – Saint Richard of Wyche, quoted by Dr. Holly Roberts in Vegetarian Christian Saints, p. 191
  • "[…] I saw that [Pythagoras] approached the altar in purity, and suffered not his belly to be polluted by partaking of the flesh of animals; and that he kept his body pure of all garments woven of dead animals refuse […] I saw that his philosophical system was in other respects oracular and truth." - Apollonius of Tyana, in The Life of Apollonius of Tyana by Philostratus, Book VI

Anti-vegetarian quotes[edit]

  • "I'm sure glad I had my bacon for breakfast." – George W. Bush in response to a vegetarian activist who yelled "Meat is murder! Pork is death!"[2]
  • "I'm a postmodern vegetarian - I eat meat ironically." – Bill Bailey (Part Troll)
  • This isn’t food – this is what food eats.
    • That '70s Show, Season 3, Episode 6 (aired 21 November 2000), written by Dean Batali and Rob Deshotel

External links[edit]

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